Yale Bible Study on Romans, with David L. Bartlett and Harold W. Attridge

Over eight videos, David L. Bartlett (Yale Divinity School) and Harold W. Attridge (Yale Divinity School) discuss Paul’s letter to the Romans.

The conversation is part of the Yale Bible Study Series presented in cooperation with The Congregational Church of New Canaan in New Canaan, CT.

The videos are accompanied by study materials on Romans, made available by the Congregational Church of New Canaan.

Romans, 1-3: Big Human Problem, Bigger Divine Solution

 

Romans, 4: Faith’s Poster Boy

Romans, 5: Living in Hope

Romans, 6: New Lord, New Life

Romans, 7-8: From Flesh to Spirit

Romans, 9-11: History Matters

Romans, 12-13: The Transformed Community

Romans, 14-16: The Generous Welcome

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Yale Bible Study on Mark, with David L. Bartlett and Allen R. Hilton

Over eight videos, David L. Bartlett (Yale Divinity School) and Minister Allen R. Hilton discuss the Gospel of Mark.

The conversation is part of the Yale Bible Study Series presented in cooperation with The Congregational Church of New Canaan in New Canaan, CT.

The videos are accompanied by study materials on the Gospel of Mark, made available by the Congregational Church of New Canaan.

Mark, 1:1-3:35: Popularity Breeds Contempt

Mark, 3:7 – 4:34: What Kinds of Kingdom?

Mark, 4:35 – 6:29: Jesus, Thou Art All Compassion

Mark, 6:30 – 8:26: Dense Disciples?

Mark, 8:27 – 10:52: Who is He? Who are We?

Mark, 11:1 – 13:36: A Healthy Insomnia?

Mark, 14:1 – 15:47: A Soldier’s Epiphany

Mark, 16:1 – 8: The Empty Tomb Effect

Yale Bible Study on Revelation, with Harold W. Attridge and David L. Bartlett

Over eight videos, Harold W. Attridge (Yale Divinity School) and David L. Bartlett (Yale Divinity School) discuss the book of Revelation.

The conversation is part of the Yale Bible Study Series presented in cooperation with The Congregational Church of New Canaan in New Canaan, CT.

The videos are accompanied by study materials on Revelation, made available by the Congregational Church of New Canaan.

Yale Bible Study on Hebrews, with Harold W. Attridge and David L. Bartlett

Over eight videos, Harold W. Attridge (Yale Divinity School) and David L. Bartlett (Yale Divinity School) discuss the book of Hebrews.

The conversation is part of the Yale Bible Study Series presented in cooperation with The Congregational Church of New Canaan in New Canaan, CT.

The videos are accompanied by study materials on Hebrews, made available by the Congregational Church of New Canaan.

Yale Bible Study on 1 Corinthians, with David L. Bartlett and Harold W. Attridge

Over nine videos, Professor Harold W. Attridge (Yale Divinity School) and Professor Emeritus David L. Bartlett (Yale Divinity School) discuss 1 Corinthians.

The conversation is part of the Yale Bible Study Series presented in cooperation with The Congregational Church of New Canaan in New Canaan, CT.

The videos are accompanied by study materials 1 Corinthians, made available by the Congregational Church of New Canaan.

Yale Bible Study on John, with David L. Bartlett and Harold W. Attridge

Over eight videos, Professor Harold W. Attridge (Yale Divinity School) and Professor Emeritus David L. Bartlett (Yale Divinity School) discuss the Gospel of John.

The conversation is part of the Yale Bible Study Series presented in cooperation with The Congregational Church of New Canaan in New Canaan, CT.

The videos are accompanied by study materials on John, made available by the Congregational Church of New Canaan.

Yale Bible Study on Luke, with David L. Bartlett and Harold W. Attridge

Over eight videos, Professor Harold W. Attridge (Yale Divinity School) and Professor Emeritus David L. Bartlett (Yale Divinity School) discuss the Gospel of Luke.

The conversation is part of the Yale Bible Study Series presented in cooperation with The Congregational Church of New Canaan in New Canaan, CT.

The videos are accompanied by study materials on Luke, made available by the Congregational Church of New Canaan.

Douglas Moo: Two-Day Intensive Course on Galatians

In July 2014, Professor Douglas J. Moo (Wheaton College) presented his perspective on Galatians, in a two-day intensive course called ‘Galatians: a Letter for Today’, held at Oak Hill College, London.

Douglas J. Moo is the author of the 2013 Baker Exegetical Commentary on Galatians.

Moo-Galatians

 

Says Dr Moo: ‘In this course, we look at the themes of Galatians in their first-century context and then discuss the shape they might take in the church today. My goals are to help us understand the issues in Galatians and Paul’s theology today; to read Galatians faithfully in light of Paul’s own situation; to find ways of appropriating the message of Galatians for today, and be emboldened to proclaim the gospel in our own ministry contexts.’

h/t: Chris Tilling

Notre Dame edX Course: Jesus in Scripture and Tradition

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The University of Notre Dame is offering a free 8-week course called Jesus in Scripture and Tradition, available from June 1, 2015.

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The instructors are Professor Gary Anderson (Hebrew Bible/Old Testament) and John C. Cavadini (Theology). The course can either be taken for free (audited), or at certificate level (at US$50), and in either case you will receive full access to the course materials.

About this course
The Bible says that Jesus was identified as God’s beloved son at his baptism. The same identification was made about Israel in the Old Testament and the disciples of Christ at their baptism. The striking similarity of these titles establishes a tight interrelationship between the people Israel, the person of Jesus Christ, and the church.

In this course, we will explore how a close reading of the book of Genesis, the Gospels, and early Christian writers can shed further light on these relationships and, in so doing, deepen our understanding of the figure of Jesus Christ. Unlike many other treatments, this course does not presume that Jesus’ character can be plumbed solely by an examination of the Gospel stories. The witness of the Jewish scriptures and the lives of the saints are also important sources for this task.

The course will be eight weeks in length and organized around three topical questions:

  • Who is Israel? (primary source material: the book of Genesis)
  • Who is Jesus? (primary source material: the Gospels and the Creeds)
  • Who is the Church? (primary source material: a selection of post-Biblical Christian writers)

No matter what your background in the study of theology, this course will provide a fresh approach to the identify of Jesus Christ that will reveal how the church has explored the unmeasurable depths of his person.

What you’ll learn

  • Recognize major people, places, and events of the Old and New Testament as related to the narratives of Israel and Jesus
  • Reflect on the mysteries of Christ
  • Examine the Church’s relationship to Christ
  • Explore religious questions through study of themes and selected biblical passages
  • Reflect on ways major biblical themes apply to modern life

 

Enroll here.

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Bart Ehrman – The History of the Bible: The Making of the New Testament Canon

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Professor Bart Ehrman delivers a 12-part lecture course on the making of the New Testament, as part of The Great Courses series. The course has been made available on archive.org.

How many of us, Christian or otherwise, are as knowledgeable about the New Testament as we would like to be? Even many who consider themselves Christian find themselves asking some—perhaps even all—of the questions so often posed by those who are not.

What different kinds of books are in the New Testament? When, how, and why were they written? What do they teach? Who actually wrote them? How were they passed forward through history? And, perhaps most important of all, why and how did some books, and not others, come to be collected into what Christians came to consider the canon of scripture that would define their belief for all time?

In The History of the Bible: The Making of the New Testament Canon, Professor Ehrman offers a fast-moving yet thorough introduction to these and other key issues in the development of Christianity.

Drawing on the award-winning teaching skills and style that have made him one of our most popular lecturers—respectful yet provocative, scholarly without sacrificing wit—Professor Ehrman has crafted a course designed to deepen the understanding of both Christians and non-Christians alike.

“The New Testament is appreciated and respected far more than it is known, and that’s not just true among religious people who consider themselves Christian. …

“This set of lectures is designed to provide an introduction to the New Testament for people who recognize or appreciate its cultural importance, or who have religious commitments to it, but who have not yet had a chance to get to know where it came from, what it contains, and how it was transmitted down to us today.

“The focus in this course will be historical, rather than theological. The course does not either presuppose faith or deny faith. It’s based neither on faith nor skepticism. … It’s simply taught from the perspective of history.”

01-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.5 MB The New Testament – An Overview
02-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.2 MB Paul – Our Earliest Christian Author
03-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.0 MB The Pauline Epistles
04-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.1 MB The Problem of Psedonymity
05-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.1 MB The Beginnings of the Gospel Traditions
06-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.0 MB The Earliest Gospels
07-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.1 MB The Other Gospels
08-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.1 MB Apocalypticism and the Apocalypse of John
09-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.2 MB The Copyists Who Gave us Scripture
10-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.1 MB Authority in the Early Church
11-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.0 MB The Importance of Interpretation
12-12[MusicBrainz (recording)] 7.2 MB When Did the Canon Get Finalized?

HarvardX Course, Early Christianity: The Letters of Paul

The HarvardX Course, “Early Christianity: The Letters of Paul” is available for free, following registration for the course. It is taught by Laura Nasrallah, Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity. You may register either as an auditor (to merely read the materials and watch the lectures) or to receive a certificate by completing the tests. In either case, you have “complete access to all of the course material, tests, and the online discussion forum”.

The course is available from January 6, 2014.

The course “Early Christianity: The Letters of Paul” explores the context of these letters in the Roman Empire and the impact of these powerful texts today.

The letters of Paul are the earliest texts in the Christian scriptures, written by a Jew at a time when the word “Christian” hadn’t yet been coined. What is the religious and political context into which they emerged? How were they first interpreted? How and why do they make such an enormous impact in Christian communities and in politics today?

Archaeological materials and ancient writings will help you to enter the ancient Mediterranean world and to think about religious groups, power, poverty, health, and the lives of elites and slaves in the Roman Empire. We’ll explore how immediately controversial these letters were, and how these letters are used today to debate relations between Christians and Jews; issues such as love, law, and grace; and topics such as charismatic Christianity, homosexuality, and women’s religious leadership.

Thomas Sheehan: Continuing Education Course on the Historical Jesus

Standford - Historical Jesus

Thomas Sheehan provides a 10-lecture short course, or continuing education course, on the historical Jesus, provided via the Stanford Continuing Studies Program (2007). Lectures from the course are available free on iTunes.

Who was the historical Jesus of Nazareth? What did he actually say and do, as contrasted with what early Christians (e.g., Paul and the Gospel writers) believed that he said and did? What did the man Jesus actually think of himself and of his mission, as contrasted with the messianic and even divine claims that the New Testament makes about him? In short, what are the differences—and continuities—between the Jesus who lived and died in history and the Christ who lives on in believers’ faith? Over the last four decades historical scholarship on Jesus and his times—whether conducted by Jews, Christians, or non-believers—has arrived at a strong consensus about what this undeniably historical figure (born ca. 4 BCE, died ca. 30 CE) said and did, and how he presented himself and his message to his Jewish audience. Often that historical evidence about Jesus does not easily dovetail with the traditional doctrines of Christianity. How then might one adjudicate those conflicting claims? This is a course about history, not about faith or theology. It will examine the best available literary and historical evidence about Jesus and his times and will discuss methodologies for interpreting that evidence, in order to help participants make their own judgments and draw their own conclusions.

Name Released Price
1

Call Me Yeshua 3/30/07 Free View In iTunes
2

Kingdom and Catastrophe 3/30/07 Free View In iTunes
3

Left Behind 3/30/07 Free View In iTunes
4

“Pealing” the Onion 3/30/07 Free View In iTunes
5

Apocalypse Now 3/30/07 Free View In iTunes
6

Words and Wonders 3/30/07 Free View In iTunes
7

The Empire Unleashed 3/30/07 Free View In iTunes
8

Crisis and Continuity 3/30/07 Free View In iTunes
9

Apocalypse to Come 3/30/07 Free View In iTunes
10

Resurrection 3/30/07 Free View In iTunes
11 The Historical Jesus Course Syllabus 4/20/07 Free View In iTunes

Shaye Cohen: The Hebrew Scriptures in Judaism and Christianity

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Professor Shaye Cohen, of Harvard University, delivers an introduction to both early Judaism and early Christianity, through the lens of their respective interpretations of the Bible.

The Hebrew Scriptures in Judaism and Christianity” is available on iTunes. The course includes a syllabus and notes for each lecture, and exam papers. There are 26 lectures in total.

In 70CE the Romans destroyed the Temple in Jerusalem. Second Temple Judaism, whose worship consisted of animal sacrifice permitted by biblical command only at the Temple, would have to reinvent itself as Rabbinic Judaism.  Contemporaneously, the authors of the New Testament Gospels were writing about the Jewish apocalyptic prophet whom they believed was the awaited messiah.  For both the rabbis and the gospel writers, for both ancient Jews and ancient Christians, the central authoritative text was the Torah and the other books we now call the Hebrew Scriptures.  This course surveys how the interpretation (and reinterpretation) of these books spawned two rival cultural systems, Judaism and Christianity.  The issues addressed are: 1) What are the truth claims of Judaism and Christianity?  2) In the first centuries of our era, how did Jewish biblical interpretation differ from Christian?  3) What differences resulted in “the parting of the ways” between Judaism and Christianity?  4) How does each culture deal with the biblical passages concerning: circumcision, the food laws, the Sabbath, Passover, the manifestations of the deity (e.g., Logos), the messiah, atonement/redemption, and the concept of Israel as the chosen of God?

Lectures:

1. Introduction to the Course
2. What is the Bible?
3. What is Judaism?
4. What is Christianity?
5. Jewish Bible Interpretation in Antiquity
6. Christian Bible Interpretation in Antiquity
7. The Parting of the Ways
8. Justine Martyr and Early Christianity
9. Circumcision: The Jewish Understanding
10. Circumcision: The Christian Understanding
11. The Food Laws: The Jewish View
12. The Food Laws: The Christian View
13. The Sabbath
14. From Shabbat to Sunday
15. Pesah/Passover
16. The Seder
17. From Psah to Pascha
18. Melito of Sardis and the Christian Passover
19. The One God, Torah, and Logos
20. The One God who is Two
21. Messiah: The Restoration of the Davidic King
22. Christ as King and Messiah
23. Atonement through Sacrifice and its Surrogates
24. Atonement through the Sacrifice of Christ
25. Israel, the People of God
26. Who is the True Israel?

Open Yale Course – Introduction to the New Testament History and Literature, with Dale Martin

Open Yale Courses offers an introductory course to the New Testament, called “Introduction to the New Testament History and Literature“. The course includes 26 lectures, available to view in video, audio, and transcript formats.

This course provides a historical study of the origins of Christianity by analyzing the literature of the earliest Christian movements in historical context, concentrating on the New Testament. Although theological themes will occupy much of our attention, the course does not attempt a theological appropriation of the New Testament as scripture. Rather, the importance of the New Testament and other early Christian documents as ancient literature and as sources for historical study will be emphasized. A central organizing theme of the course will focus on the differences within early Christianity (-ies).

Dale Martin

Dale B. Martin is the Woolsey Professor of Religious Studies at Yale. He was educated at Abilene Christian University, Princeton Theological Seminary, and Yale University. His work explores the New Testament, Christian origins, the Greco-Roman world, the ancient family, and gender and sexuality in the ancient world. Professor Martin has been awarded fellowships by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Fulbright Commission, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, and the Lilly Foundation. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (elected 2009). His publications include Slavery as Salvation, The Corinthian Body, Inventing Superstition, Sex and the Single Savior, and Pedagogy of the Bible.