Willi Braun: “When and Why Did the Gospel of Mark Become a Christian Text?”

Professor Willi Braun (University of Alberta) asks “When and Why Did the Gospel of Mark Become a Christian Text?’ in a lecture delivered at the Institut für Theologie und Religionswissenschaft at the University of Hanover, on May 15, 2012. 

 

Advertisements

William Arnal on why the First Christians were not Christians

Professor William Arnal (University of Regina) addresses the question “Just how ‘Christian’ were the first Christians?” with reference to the Gospels of Thomas and Mark. His answer is, not at all. The lecture was delivered at the Institut für Theologie und Religionswissenschaft at the University of Hanover, on May 28, 2013.

Notre Dame edX Course: Jesus in Scripture and Tradition

edx-logo-header

The University of Notre Dame is offering a free 8-week course called Jesus in Scripture and Tradition, available from June 1, 2015.

john-cavadinigary_anderson

The instructors are Professor Gary Anderson (Hebrew Bible/Old Testament) and John C. Cavadini (Theology). The course can either be taken for free (audited), or at certificate level (at US$50), and in either case you will receive full access to the course materials.

About this course
The Bible says that Jesus was identified as God’s beloved son at his baptism. The same identification was made about Israel in the Old Testament and the disciples of Christ at their baptism. The striking similarity of these titles establishes a tight interrelationship between the people Israel, the person of Jesus Christ, and the church.

In this course, we will explore how a close reading of the book of Genesis, the Gospels, and early Christian writers can shed further light on these relationships and, in so doing, deepen our understanding of the figure of Jesus Christ. Unlike many other treatments, this course does not presume that Jesus’ character can be plumbed solely by an examination of the Gospel stories. The witness of the Jewish scriptures and the lives of the saints are also important sources for this task.

The course will be eight weeks in length and organized around three topical questions:

  • Who is Israel? (primary source material: the book of Genesis)
  • Who is Jesus? (primary source material: the Gospels and the Creeds)
  • Who is the Church? (primary source material: a selection of post-Biblical Christian writers)

No matter what your background in the study of theology, this course will provide a fresh approach to the identify of Jesus Christ that will reveal how the church has explored the unmeasurable depths of his person.

What you’ll learn

  • Recognize major people, places, and events of the Old and New Testament as related to the narratives of Israel and Jesus
  • Reflect on the mysteries of Christ
  • Examine the Church’s relationship to Christ
  • Explore religious questions through study of themes and selected biblical passages
  • Reflect on ways major biblical themes apply to modern life

 

Enroll here.

notre-dame-edx

John Barclay: Why did it matter to the early church to give to the poor?

Professor John Barclay (Lightfoot Professor of Divinity at Durham University) delivered a lecture at the Houston Baptist University (HBU) Theology Conference, on April 21, 2015, entitled “‘The poor you have always with you.’ Why it mattered to the early church to give to the poor”

John Barclay is Lightfoot Professor of Divinity at Durham University (UK). After studies in Classics and Theology at Cambridge University, he took his PhD at Cambridge University, and has taught New Testament at Glasgow University (1984-2003) and Durham (2003 onwards). His research has been focused in Pauline studies, in Diaspora Judaism, and in Josephus. He is publishing a book on Pauline theology this summer entitled Paul and the Gift (Eerdmans).

Candida Moss on The Invention of Voluntary Martyrdom in Early Christianity

persecuted-scholar

An iTune audio recording is available for Prof Candida Moss’s lecture, “The Invention of Voluntary Martyrdom in Early Christianity”, part of the Dean’s Lecture Series at Candler School of Theology, Nov 9, 2011.

Candida Moss is Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame.

h/t: Jim West

Barbara Rossing: Meeting Paul Again for the First Time

holden

Dr Barbara Rossing provides a series of lectures on Paul, entitled “Meeting Paul Again for the First Time”, delivered in August 2000 at the Holden Village, which are available on mp3 audio files:

Phil Harland – Online Edition of Associations, Synagogues, and Congregations

harland-associations-synagogues-and-congregations

Dr Philip Harland has made available a revised, online edition of his book Associations, Synagogues, and Congregations: Claiming a Place in Ancient Mediterranean Society (September 2013) with clickable links to inscriptions that are collected together on the book’s sister-site Associations in the Greco-Roman World: A Companion to the Sourcebook.

A groundbreaking study. Harland’s focus on associations in Roman antiquity as a way better to understand civic social life and the social sensibilities of those involved in such associations sets the stage for a reconsideration of the place of ancient Christianities and Judaisms in the Roman order. What emerges is a realistic picture of the ancient Christian associations of Asia Minor that produced such texts as 1 Peter, the Apocalypse of John, and the Pastoral Epistles. This new picture emphasized the concrete, day-to-day ways in which ancient Christians did claim a place for themselves within the empire, and soundly dismisses conceptualizations of Christianity as an isolated sect. This is an indispensable step toward re-imagining ancient civic life, ancient religion, and the origins of Christianity as well.

– William Arnal, University of Regina, Saskatchewan (on the first edition)

Part One (“Associations in Asia Minor“) can be downloaded or read online free, and the entire book may be downloaded at a pay-what-you-will price ($0-$15).

Why Study? University of Nottingham Video Series

The Why Study Theology and Religious Studies? series from the University of Nottingham contains various contributions from biblical studies. These include:

Why Study the Didache? with Tom O’Loughlin

Why Study Early Christianity? with Tom O’Loughlin

Why Study Orality? with Tom O’Loughlin

Why Study the Protoevangelium of James? with Tom O’Loughlin

Why Study Rabbinic Judaism? with Holger Zellentin

Why Study Rudolf Bultmann? with Henri Gagey

Why Study Paul’s Letter to the Romans? with Richard Bell

Why Study the Death of Jesus in Paul? with Richard Bell

Why Study St Paul and Israel? with Richard Bell

Why Study the Hebrew Bible? with Carly Crouch

Why Study Prophecy? with Carly Crouch

Why Study Biblical Warfare? with Carly Crouch

Why Study Jesus Christ? with Roland Deines

Why Study the Pharisees? with Roland Deines

Why Study James of Jerusalem? with Roland Deines

Why Study the Old Testament alongside the New? with Margaret Barker

Why Study Hebrew? with Peter Watts

Paula Fredriksen on Paul and Augustine

Paula Fredriksen’s lecture ‘”All Israel Will Be Saved”: Paul and Augustine on the Redemption of the Jews’ for Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies is available on YouTube and uploaded by the University of California Television (UCTV).