Amy-Jill Levine on The Carpenter, Gender, and Sexuality: The 42nd Annual Antoinette Brown lecture

Professor Amy-Jill Levine (Vanderbilt Divinity School) delivered the 42nd Annual Antoinette Brown lecture on March 31, 2016, at Benton Chapel, Vanderbilt University Divinity School. The lecture also celebrates the 20th anniversary of the Carpenter Program in Religion, Gender, and Sexuality.

Levine’s lecture was entitled “The Carpenter, Gender, and Sexuality: The Use and Abuse of the Gospels in Politics and Piety”. Her lecture looks at what the Bible teaches about rape, adultery, and women’s sexual pleasure. She also discusses the contemporary deployment of the Bible as a weapon: contemporary interpretations of the Bible which result in people dying, such as condemnations of homosexuality and abortion, and domestic abuse. Lastly, she examines the roles and authority of women in the Bible.

The lecture begins at 9:00.

Troubling Legacies: Anti-Judaism in Antiquity and Its Aftermath

The 2014 Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism Annual Conference examined “Troubling Legacies: Anti-Judaism in Antiquity and Its Aftermath”. The four panels are available for viewing on YouTube.

troubling-legacies

Panel  1: Non-Christian Greek and Roman Anti-Judaism?

Erich Gruen, “Was there Judeophobia in Classical Antiquity?”

Benjamin Isaac, “Greek and Roman Hostility: Cultural Incompatibility”

Dale B. Martin (moderated session)

Panel 2: John’s “Jews” and their Effective Force in Reception History

Adele Reinhartz, “The Devil Incarnate: John’s anti-Jewish legacy”

Ruth Sheridan, “Reproducing Johannine Anti-Judaism: The Case of Commentary on John 8:32”

Harold Attridge (moderated session)

Panel 3: Nineteenth Century Philosophy and Theology

George Kohler, “Supersessionism in Jewish-Christian Debates in Germany between 1830-1870”

Anders Gerdmar, “The Construction of the Jews in 19th Century German Protestantism: the Case of Tübingen professors Beck and Baur.”

Paul Franks (moderated session)
Joshua Ezra Burns (respondent)

Panel 4: Contemporary Legacies

Sarah Hammerschlag, “The figure of the Jew and the New Universalism”

Ward Blanton, “What is an Apparatus?” Machineries of Paulinism and the Force of the Name ‘Jew'”

J. Kameron Carter, “(In-)Sovereignty in Palestine: Négritude and the Reproductions of Colonialism.”

Amy-Jill Levine on Anti-Jewish New Testament Interpretation

Professor Amy-Jill Levine delivered the Comparative Theology Lecture at Harvard Divinity School on October 17, 2012: “From Donation to Diatribe: How Anti-Jewish Interpretation Cashes Out”.

In Mark 12:41-44, Jesus says of a poor widow who makes a donation to the Jerusalem Temple: “she has thrown in her whole life.” Is the widow exploited by a Jewish system that values money over compassion? Is she a faithful worshiper who reveals the Temple’s welcome of rich and poor, male and female? Is she a foreshadowing of Jesus, who will give up his life as a “ransom for many?” The answers depend upon the reader’s sensibilities.

Levine is University Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies, and Professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University Divinity School and College of Arts and Sciences.

Levine’s lecture commences at 5:57.

Paula Fredricksen: Paul and Augustine on the Redemption of the Jews

On University of California Television, Professor Paula Fredricksen compares the views of Paul and Augustine on the divine redemption of Jews. The 2009 lecture was sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies. Fredricksen discusses some of the content of her book Augustine and the Jews: A Christian Defense of Jews and Judaism (Yale University Press, 2009).

Paula Fredriksen, author and Aurelio Professor of Scripture, Boston University sheds new light on the origins of anti-Semitism and opens a path toward better understanding between two of the world’s great religions. She focuses in particular on the vast change from Paul to Augustine in the Christian message of Jewish redemption.