The Bible in Politics conference

THE BIBLE IN POLITICS
2-3 June, 2017

The Bible in Politics conference was held earlier this month at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, London. St Mary’s has made the videos of the presentations available on their YouTube channel.

Friday 2 June
10.30-11.15am Hugh Pyper, ‘“Don’t Mention the Bible! Religion, Identity and Contemporary Scottish Politics’

11.15-12.00 Christina Petterson, ‘The Politics of Biblical Translation’

12.15-1pm Fatima Tofighi, ‘Paul, the Mystic Who Wasn’t a Mystic: A Reexamination in Light of the Politics of Religious Scholarship’

2.05-2.50pm Tarcisius Mukaka, ‘“Let Every Person be Subject to the Governing Authorities”: Reading Rom. 13.1-7 against the Grain, or a Postcolonial Reading’

3-3.45pm Jo Carruthers, ‘The Bible, Aesthetics and the Origins of the American Self: Islamophobia and Protestant Aesthetics in Homeland’

4-4.30pm Taylor Weaver, ‘Trump’s Bible: Weakening Relevance in the American Political Sphere’

4.30-5pm Chris Meredith, ‘The Bible and the Poetics of Modern Militarism: The Good Samaritan and the UK’s 2016 Airstrikes in Syria’

Saturday 3 June
10-11.15am
Erin Runions, ‘Carceral Technologies, Religious Affects, and US Theopolitics’

11.30am-12.15pm Lesleigh Cushing, ‘The “Good Book” in the “Promised Land”: The Bible in Contemporary American Politics’

12.15-1pm David Tollerton, ‘Alternative Facts from the Whirlwind: Zvyagintsev’s Leviathan and the Obfuscating Oppression of the Divine/State’

2.15-3pm Robert Myles, ‘Fishing for Entrepreneurs in the Sea of Galilee’

3-4pm or so James Crossley, ‘Italian Politics, Italian Westerns…and the Bible’

Ward Blanton, “Apostle of the Self-Help Entrepreneurs?”

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Conference on Ancient and Modern Interactions with Religious Outsiders

On March 14-16th, 2016, The Goldstein-Goren Department of Jewish Thought at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev hosted a conference called “Perceiving the Other: Ancient and Modern Interactions with Outsiders”.

The purpose of this colloquium is to re-examine both ancient Christian, Jewish, and pagan portrayals of outsiders and modern construals of these portrayals. In what ways, both positive and negative, do ancient writers interact with and relate to those outside of their religious traditions? In what ways do modern scholars appropriate and even inflect these earlier portrayals in light of their own modern preconceptions? This colloquium will devote itself to the methodological questions surrounding the use of diverse ancient sources for the construction of the other. The goal is to shed new light on ancient interactions between different religious groups in order both to describe more accurately these relationships and to provide greater understanding and sympathy amongst modern religious traditions.

Monday, March 14

Opening Remarks and Greetings:
– Prof. Rivka Carmi, President, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
– Prof. David Newman, Dean, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
– Prof. Uri Ehrlich, Chair, The Goldstein-Goren Department of Jewish Thought, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
-Prof. Haim Kreisel, Head, The Goldstein-Goren International Center for Jewish Thought, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Prof. Albert Baumgarten (Bar-Ilan University): John the Baptist and Jesus: An Ancient Dialogue of Disciples

Prof. Matthew Thiessen (Saint Louis University): Animalistic Gentiles according to Followers of Jesus

Prof. Uta Poplutz (University of Wuppertal): The Image of the Opponents in the Gospel of Matthew

[no video]

Tuesday, March 15

Prof. Tobias Nicklas (Regensburg University): Revisiting the Other: ‘The Jews’ in the Gospel of John

Prof. Nathan Eubank (University of Oxford): Damned Disciples: the Permeability of the Boundary between Insiders and Outsiders in Early Christianity

Prof. Katell Berthelot (CNRS): The Paradoxical Resemblance of the Roman Other

Prof. Wolfgang Grünstäudl (University of Wuppertal): Different Approaches to the Core of Christianity

Prof. Shaya Gafni (Hebrew University of Jerusalem): Various ‘Others’ in Rabbinic Literature: Between Babylonia and the Land of Israel

Dr. Haim Weiss (Ben-Gurion University): The Bodily Images of Shimon Bar-Kosibah in Rabbinic Literature

Dr. Michal Bar-Asher Siegal (Ben-Gurion University): Christian Heretics in the Babylonian Talmud

Prof. Christine Hayes (Yale University): Different Differences: The Complicated Goy in Classical Rabbinic Sources

Amy-Jill Levine on The Carpenter, Gender, and Sexuality: The 42nd Annual Antoinette Brown lecture

Professor Amy-Jill Levine (Vanderbilt Divinity School) delivered the 42nd Annual Antoinette Brown lecture on March 31, 2016, at Benton Chapel, Vanderbilt University Divinity School. The lecture also celebrates the 20th anniversary of the Carpenter Program in Religion, Gender, and Sexuality.

Levine’s lecture was entitled “The Carpenter, Gender, and Sexuality: The Use and Abuse of the Gospels in Politics and Piety”. Her lecture looks at what the Bible teaches about rape, adultery, and women’s sexual pleasure. She also discusses the contemporary deployment of the Bible as a weapon: contemporary interpretations of the Bible which result in people dying, such as condemnations of homosexuality and abortion, and domestic abuse. Lastly, she examines the roles and authority of women in the Bible.

The lecture begins at 9:00.

Bible, Empire, and Reception History conference – Live Streaming November 18-19, 2015

bible-empire-reception-history

Columbia Theological Seminary announced that it will livestream its upcoming conference on Bible, Empire, and Reception History during November 18-19. The Bible, Empire, and Reception History conference will explore the production and use of the Bible in various historical and geographic contexts of empire. It will consider the use of postcolonial criticism in interpreting biblical texts and its implications in modern contexts.
Columbia Connections

The live stream will be available on LiveStream. Columbia Theological Seminary (Georgia, Atlanta) is in the U.S. Eastern Standard Time zone (UTC/GMT -5 hours). The conference schedule is as follows:

8:30-9:00, Wednesday, November 18
Welcome, Introductions and Key Issues

9:00-12:30, Wednesday, November 18
Session # 1. The Bible and Ancient Empires
Keynote Speakers: Carol A. Newsom and Richard Horsley
Respondents: Warren Carter and Esther Menn
Panelists: Christine Yoder (Presider), Stephen Moore, Brent Strawn, Eric Barreto

2:00-5:30, Wednesday, November 18
Session # 2. The Bible, Empire, and the Americas
Keynote Speakers: Yvonne Sherwood and Jaime Lara
Respondents: Fernando Segovia and Rhondda Robinson Thomas
Panelists: Brennan Breed (Presider), Ana T. Valdez, Dianne Stewart, Gregory Cuéllar

9:00-12:30, Thursday, November 19
Session # 3. The Bible, Empire, and Asia
Keynote Speakers: Kwok Pui-Lan and Mitri Raheb
Respondents: Tat-Siong Benny Liew and Mrinalini Sebastian
Panelists: Raj Nadella (Presider), Jin Young Choi, Uriah Kim, Haruko Ward

2:00-5:30, Thursday, November 19
Session # 4. The Bible, Empire, and Africa
Keynote Speakers: Musa Dube and Hendrik Bosman
Respondents: Dora Mbuwayesango and Sarojini Nadar
Panelists: Emmanuel Lartey (Presider), Temba Mafico, Safwat Marzouk, Madipoane Masenya

Columbia have also made available videos of the conference presentations.

 

Emerson Powery on “The Origins of Whiteness”: The 2015 Jane D. Schaberg lecture

On March 26, 2015, Professor Emerson Powery (Mercy College) delivered the Jane D. Schaberg lecture in Scripture Studies, as a part of the 2015 Cushing Distinguished Lecture series at University of Detroit Mercy. His lecture discusses the origins of whiteness in slave narratives and the interpretation of the “Curse of Ham” narrative.

“The Origins of Whiteness and the Black (Biblical) Imagination: The Bible and the Slave Narrative”

Racialising Jesus as White in 19th-Century U.S.A. – Paul Harvey

color-of-christOn March 25, 2013, Professor Paul Harvey (University of Colorado) delivered a lecture at Baylor University on the topic of the racialisation of Jesus as a white man in 19th-century USA.

The Civil War was a climactic moment, and its aftermath a turning point, not only in American national history, but in a lesser-known battle to bring Jesus into the sectional struggles of the mid-nineteenth century. – Lecture Paul Harvey, a graduate of Oklahoma Baptist University (BA 1983), and the University of California, Berkeley (Ph.D. 1992), is the author/editor of eight books in American religious history, including The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in American History (co-authored with Edward J. Blum, University of North Carolina Press).

Troubling Legacies: Anti-Judaism in Antiquity and Its Aftermath

The 2014 Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism Annual Conference examined “Troubling Legacies: Anti-Judaism in Antiquity and Its Aftermath”. The four panels are available for viewing on YouTube.

troubling-legacies

Panel  1: Non-Christian Greek and Roman Anti-Judaism?

Erich Gruen, “Was there Judeophobia in Classical Antiquity?”

Benjamin Isaac, “Greek and Roman Hostility: Cultural Incompatibility”

Dale B. Martin (moderated session)

Panel 2: John’s “Jews” and their Effective Force in Reception History

Adele Reinhartz, “The Devil Incarnate: John’s anti-Jewish legacy”

Ruth Sheridan, “Reproducing Johannine Anti-Judaism: The Case of Commentary on John 8:32”

Harold Attridge (moderated session)

Panel 3: Nineteenth Century Philosophy and Theology

George Kohler, “Supersessionism in Jewish-Christian Debates in Germany between 1830-1870”

Anders Gerdmar, “The Construction of the Jews in 19th Century German Protestantism: the Case of Tübingen professors Beck and Baur.”

Paul Franks (moderated session)
Joshua Ezra Burns (respondent)

Panel 4: Contemporary Legacies

Sarah Hammerschlag, “The figure of the Jew and the New Universalism”

Ward Blanton, “What is an Apparatus?” Machineries of Paulinism and the Force of the Name ‘Jew'”

J. Kameron Carter, “(In-)Sovereignty in Palestine: Négritude and the Reproductions of Colonialism.”

Biblical Studies Online Podcast 4: An Interview with Robert Myles and Michael Sandford

BSO

The latest Biblical Studies Online podcast is available on iTunes or, if iTunes isn’t your thing, available here.

RM&MS

James Crossley interviews Robert Myles, author of The Homeless Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew (Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2014), and Michael Sandford, author of Poverty, Wealth, and Empire: Jesus and Postcolonial Criticism (Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2014). In addition to discussing their latest books, the interview covers issues of class, postcolonialism, and biblical scholarship.

Amy-Jill Levine on Anti-Jewish New Testament Interpretation

Professor Amy-Jill Levine delivered the Comparative Theology Lecture at Harvard Divinity School on October 17, 2012: “From Donation to Diatribe: How Anti-Jewish Interpretation Cashes Out”.

In Mark 12:41-44, Jesus says of a poor widow who makes a donation to the Jerusalem Temple: “she has thrown in her whole life.” Is the widow exploited by a Jewish system that values money over compassion? Is she a faithful worshiper who reveals the Temple’s welcome of rich and poor, male and female? Is she a foreshadowing of Jesus, who will give up his life as a “ransom for many?” The answers depend upon the reader’s sensibilities.

Levine is University Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies, and Professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University Divinity School and College of Arts and Sciences.

Levine’s lecture commences at 5:57.

Roundtable discussion of White Men’s Magic: Scripturalization as Slavery

Claremont Graduate Univerity’s Institute for Signifying Scriptures held a roundtable discussion of Vincent L. Wimbush’s White Men’s Magic: Scripturalization as Slavery (OUP, 2012), on October 11, 2012. The book examines The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African (1789), the processes of scripturalization, and the production of discourse and counter-discourse, against the backdrop of slavery.

A roundtable book review of Vincent L. Wimbush’s “White Men’s Magic: Scripturalization as Slavery,” at Claremont Graduate University’s Institute for Signifying Scriptures. Moderator is Karen L. Yonemoto of Claremont McKenna College. Panelists are Ronne Hartfield, Robert Hill, Tat-siong Benny Liew, Charles H. Long, and Valorie Thomas.

Paula Fredricksen: Paul and Augustine on the Redemption of the Jews

On University of California Television, Professor Paula Fredricksen compares the views of Paul and Augustine on the divine redemption of Jews. The 2009 lecture was sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies. Fredricksen discusses some of the content of her book Augustine and the Jews: A Christian Defense of Jews and Judaism (Yale University Press, 2009).

Paula Fredriksen, author and Aurelio Professor of Scripture, Boston University sheds new light on the origins of anti-Semitism and opens a path toward better understanding between two of the world’s great religions. She focuses in particular on the vast change from Paul to Augustine in the Christian message of Jewish redemption.

Rob Marshall Interview with James Crossley on Jesus in an Age of Neoliberalism

Rob Marshall interviews James Crossley about his book, Jesus in an Age of Neoliberalism (2012). The interview is available on Crossley’s webpage at the University of Sheffield.

International Voices in Biblical Studies series

IVBS

The International Voices in Biblical Studies series is an online, open-access series published by SBL.

International Voices in Biblical Studies (IVBS) is an SBL peer-reviewed series that publishes monographs, volumes of collected essays, conference proceedings, and single articles meant to further scholarship in biblical studies. Its main goal is to make the excellent work of colleagues in under-resourced parts of the world known all over the globe, including the traditional centers of biblical scholarship in (mainly) Europe and North America.

The works in the series address the reception history of the Bible in Latin America, Africa, Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East and South Asian Region, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia, and the Pacific.

The general editors are Monica Melanchthon (United Faculty of Theology ) and Louis Jonker (University of Stellenbosch). The series’ website provides information regarding proposals.

Initial titles include:

ZER RIMONIM Studies in Biblical Literature and Jewish Exegesis 
Michael Avioz, 2013
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Women at Work in the Deuteronomistic History
Mercedes L. García Bachmann, 2013
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The Old Testament and Christian Spirituality: Theoretical and Practical Essays from a South African Perspective
Christo Lombaard, 2012
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Reading Ezra 9–10 Tu’A-Wise: Rethinking Biblical Interpretation in Oceania
Nasili Vaka’uta, 2011
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Global Hermeneutics?: Reflections and Consequences
Knut Holter and Louis Jonker, 2010
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In Our Time: Online and Podcasts (BBC Radio 4)

In Our Time is a BBC Radio 4 programme on the history of ideas and is presented by Melvyn Bragg. Its range of episodes are classified under the headings ‘Religion’, ‘History’, ‘Culture’, ‘Philosophy’, and ‘Science’. The format consists of Bragg asking questions to, and leading a discussion with, a panel of academics. There are over 600 episodes – either for listening online and/or download – and the full archive is available here. There are numerous episodes covering topics in biblical studies and relevant areas:

Prophecy (13 June, 2013)

Gnosticism (2 May, 2013)

King Solomon (7 June, 2012)

Judas Maccabeus (24 November, 2011)

The Dawn of the Iron Age (24 March, 2011)

The City [Part 1] (25 March 2010)

The Augustan Age (11 June 2009)

St Paul (28 May, 2009)

Miracles (25 September, 2008)

The Greek Myths (13 March, 2008)

Hell (21 December, 2006)

Heaven (22 December, 2005)

Archaeology and Imperialism (14 April 2005)

Angels (24 March, 2005)

Zoroastrianism (11 November, 2004)

Babylon (3 June 2004)

The Fall (8 April, 2004)

The Alphabet (18 December, 2003)

The Devil (11 December, 2003)

The Apocalypse (17 July, 2003)

The Lindisfarne Gospels (20 February, 2003)

The Soul (6 June 2002)

In addition to the episodes listed above, there are episodes on a range of topics and individuals which will be directly relevant to certain areas of biblical studies research (e.g. Plato, Pliny, Roman satire, Wyclif, Erasmus, Milton, historiography, cultural memory).