Christopher Hill on the Seventeenth-century English Bible

‘The expressed idea was to have in every parish in the country an educated parson who’d been at Oxford or Cambridge and so hadn’t a dangerous idea in his head who would guide the reading of the Bible’ (Christopher Hill)

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The following is an interview with the historian of seventeenth-century England, Christopher Hill (1912-2003), on BBC Radio Four for ‘Conversations with Historians’. The interviewer is John Miller. No date is given but it must be from the early 1990s as it mentions John Major’s government and that it is ’35, 34 years’ since he left the Communist Party (c. 1956/57).The use of the Bible, including the use of the Bible in the regicide, is found at 5.53-8.22 and 15.35-18.00, and issues of god and religion are present throughout.

Hill was a prolific writer and wrote a lot on the uses of Bible, including The English Bible and the Seventeenth-Century Revolution (1993). There is an extended discussion of Hill’s use of the Bible in his academic work at Harnessing Chaos.

Biblical Studies Online podcast: An interview with Ward Blanton on Paul, politics and philosophy

wardblantonThe latest Biblical Studies Online podcast (BSO06) is now available on iTunes for download here or, for non-iTunes users, here. It is an interview with Ward Blanton, Reader in Biblical Cultures and European Thought, University of Kent. Blanton talks about Paul, politics, philosophy, Jewishness, revolutionary thinking, Pauline studies, and his book, A Materialism for the Masses: St Paul and the Philosophy of Undying Life (Columbia University Press, 2014).

Roland Boer on the Sacred Economy of Ancient Israel

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In an audio interview with Marginalia‘s Joseph Ryan Kelly, Roland Boer (Professor of Liberal Arts at Renmin University, Beijing) discusses his book The Sacred Economy of Ancient Israel (Westminster John Knox, 2015).

How a Marxist-inspired theory and Soviet-era Russian scholarship help us better understand the world of the Bible. Joseph Ryan Kelly talks with Roland Boer about his new book, The Sacred Economy of Ancient Israel.

 

Richard Dawkins converses with John Huddlestun about the Non-Historicity of the Old Testament

Zoologist Dr Richard Dawkins (New College, Oxford) converses with Professor John Huddlestun (College of Charleston) about the non-historicity of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament.

Chris Tilling converses with Douglas Campbell about Paul

Dr Chris Tilling (St Mellitus College) and Professor Douglas Campbell (Duke University Divinity School) discuss “apocalyptic readings of Paul, prison ministry, and their books”. After a bit of idle chit-chat, they get going at 4:30 or so.

Chris Tilling is Lecturer in New Testament Studies at St Mellitus College and Visiting Lecturer in Theology at King’s College, London. He is the author of Paul’s Divine Christology (2012), the editor of Beyond Old and New Perspectives on Paul (2014) and author, together with Michael Bird, Craig Evans, Simon Gathercole and Charles Hill, of How God Became Jesus (2014). He also runs the biblical studies blog, “Chrisendom.”

Douglas Campbell is Professor of New Testament at Duke University Divinity School. His main research interests comprise the life and thought (i.e. theology and its development) of Paul with particular reference to soteriological models rooted in apocalyptic as against justification or salvation-history. His publications include Framing Paul: An Epistolary Biography (2014), and he edited The Call to Serve: Biblical and Theological Perspectives on Ministry in Honour of Bishop Penny Jamieson. Campbell has also written The Quest for Paul’s Gospel: A Suggested Strategy (2005), and The Deliverance of God: An Apocalyptic Rereading of Justification in Paul (2009).

George W. E. Nickelsburg: “The Temple According to 1 Enoch”

Professor Emeritus George W. E. Nickelsburg (University of Iowa) delivered a lecture on “The Temple According to 1 Enoch” on February 19, 2013, at Utah State University.

The paper was later published as “The Temple According to 1 Enoch“, BYU Studies Quarterly 53.1 (2014): 7-24.

During the Second Temple period (516 BCE to 70 CE), most Jews in Jerusalem worshipped at the Jerusalem temple. But a separate community at Qumran decried the lack of ritual purity in the activity at the Second Temple and saw their community as an ersatz for the temple. Literature at Qumran included 1 Enoch, a collection of five tractates composed in the Aramaic language between the fourth century BCE and the turn of the era and ascribed to the ancient patriarch Enoch, the head of the seventh generation after creation (Gen. 5:18–24). Some of the tractates are concerned about a dysfunctional Jerusalem cult and resolve the problem of how to worship by looking forward to the approaching eschaton. Other sections of 1 Enoch tell that the real action is already taking place in the true temple, which is the heavenly temple. There, variously, God is enthroned, and the Son of Man is being prepared to enact divine judgment so that God’s will may be done on earth as it is in heaven. Here Enoch remains until the end-time, witnessing the interaction between God and the archangels. This vision refers to three Israelite sanctuaries—the tabernacle, the First Temple, and the Second Temple—and to the establishment of a new Jerusalem, in which there is no temple, because the city itself serves as a temple.

Daniel K. Falk on Prayer in the Dead Sea Scrolls

Professor Daniel K. Falk (University of Oregon) delivered the 2013 Peter Craigie Memorial Lecture, “Singing With Angels: Prayer in the Dead Sea Scrolls” at the University of Calgary on October 17, 2013.

Why did Jews begin to pray together daily? Prayer as regularized service of the community is one of the profound contributions of Judaism to western civilization, but the origins of Jewish liturgy remain obscure. The most important evidence is to be found among the Dead Sea Scrolls, which include the earliest known collections of Jewish liturgical prayers. Falk explores the significance of these prayers for understanding the distinctive religious life of these particular sectarians, who joined the angels in worship of God and warfare against dark forces, and in their prayer sought to harmonize with God’s created order and rectify disorder. Falk also reflects on what these texts reveal of trends in early Jewish prayer and piety more broadly.

Audio of the lecture is available here, beginning at 20:00.

John Barclay on his book Paul and the Gift

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Eerdmans interviews Professor John M.G. Barclay about the content of his recent book, Paul and the Gift (Eerdmans, 2015).

See also in Biblical Studies Online: 

Under Grace: The Christ-Gift and the Construction of a Christian Habitus

John Barclay on Social-Scientific Methods in Biblical Studies and the Anthropology of Gifting

 

h/t: Mark Goodacre, “John Barclay Interviewed by Eerdmans

Willi Braun: “When and Why Did the Gospel of Mark Become a Christian Text?”

Professor Willi Braun (University of Alberta) asks “When and Why Did the Gospel of Mark Become a Christian Text?’ in a lecture delivered at the Institut für Theologie und Religionswissenschaft at the University of Hanover, on May 15, 2012. 

 

William Arnal on why the First Christians were not Christians

Professor William Arnal (University of Regina) addresses the question “Just how ‘Christian’ were the first Christians?” with reference to the Gospels of Thomas and Mark. His answer is, not at all. The lecture was delivered at the Institut für Theologie und Religionswissenschaft at the University of Hanover, on May 28, 2013.

Helen Bond on Simon of Cyrene

Professor Helen Bond delivered her inaugural professorial lecture, and the opening lecture for the 2015/16 academic year at the University of Edinburgh, on September 17, 2015. The title of the lecture was “Paragon of Discipleship or Parody of Kingship? Simon of Cyrene in Mark’s Gospel”. Bond argues that Mark did not present Simon of Cyrene’s carrying of Jesus’s cross as an exemplary act of discipleship, but that Mark employs Simon to further the Gospel’s presentation of Jesus as King.

Helen [Bond] is simply the best New Testament scholar currently in post in the UK.
– Paul Foster

After introductions by Professor Paul Foster (2:05) and Professor Dorothy Miell (3:39), Helen Bond’s lecture begins at 8:00.

 

François Bovon on the Soul in Early Christianity

Professor François Bovon (13 March 1938 – 1 November 2013) delivered the 2009 Ingersoll Lecture on December 8, 2009 at Harvard University, “The Soul’s Comeback: Immortality and Resurrection in Early Christianity”.

The lecture begins at 10:50.

 

Joel Kaminsky on whether the Book of Job sweeps away a mechanistic concept of divine retribution

Professor Joel S. Kaminsky (Smith College) delivered the 2015 Albert and Vera List Fund for Jewish Studies Lecture at Harvard Divinity School on February 18, 2015, “Would You Impugn My Justice?”

Much recent scholarship has portrayed the book of Job as sweeping away an earlier, supposedly mechanistic theology of divine reward and punishment. Joel S. Kaminsky argues that the widespread biblical notion that God rewards the righteous and punishes the wicked is more complex than often recognized. Recovering its nuances not only helps one better understand the theological outlook of books like Deuteronomy, Proverbs, and Psalms, but also helps one better grasp the debates within the book of Job.

00:00 Welcome by Francis X. Clooney, S.J., Parkman Professor of Divinity and Professor of Comparative Theology, Harvard Divinity School

1:45 Introduction by Jon D. Levenson, Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies, Harvard Divinity School

3:55 Joel S. Kaminsky, Professor of Religion and Morningstar Family Professor in Jewish Studies, Smith College

39:30 Q&A with Joel S. Kaminsky

A version of the lecture was published as “Would You Impugn My Justice? A Nuanced Approach to the Hebrew Bible’s Theology of Divine Recompense” Interpretation 69.3 (2015): 299-310.