François Bovon on the Soul in Early Christianity

Professor François Bovon (13 March 1938 – 1 November 2013) delivered the 2009 Ingersoll Lecture on December 8, 2009 at Harvard University, “The Soul’s Comeback: Immortality and Resurrection in Early Christianity”.

The lecture begins at 10:50.

 

Benjamin Dunning on Universalism in the Philosopher’s Paul and Sexual Difference

dunning

Professor Benjamin Dunning presents a lecture on Paul’s universalism, the embodied human, and recent philosophical engagement with Paul by figures such as Stanislas Breton, Giorgio AgambenAlain Badiou, and Slavoj Žižek. The lecture is entitled “Christ Without Adam: Subjectivity and Sexual Difference in the Philosopher’s Paul”, and is based on his 2014 book of the same title.

Benjamin Dunning discusses his book, Christ Without Adam: Subjectivity and Sexual Difference in the Philosopher’s Paul. Trained in early Christianity as well as critical and feminist theory, Professor Dunning is especially interested in furthering the conversation between the history of Christianity, philosophical theology, and contemporary theories of the subject.

Joel Green: On Doing Without a Soul

Dr. Joel Green delivers a paper at the Neuroscience and the Soul Conference, “On Doing Without a Soul: A New Testament Perspective”, Biola University, May 10, 2013.

Dr. Joel Green discusses the theological anthropology of the New Testament. He argues that the writings of the New Testament do not necessitate a dualist view of human substance. Rather, he argues for a monism that encompasses the physical and non-physical aspects of humanity. Dr. Doug Huffman responds to his argument.

See also, from the same conference:

John Cooper, “Biblical Hermeneutics and the Body-Soul Debate”

Panel Two: Joel Green, Doug Huffman, John W. Cooper, and Jason McMartin

Benjamin D. Sommer on God’s Body

benjamin-sommer

Benjamin D. Sommer presents four lectures on the body or bodies of God, as understood in the Bible and in ancient Near Eastern, Jewish and Christian traditions. The lectures are available in mp3 and on iTunes and were originally delivered at the Dr. Harvey H. Ammerman Memorial Study Retreat, September 2010.

The Bodies of God and the World of Ancient Israel: Part I

Yesh Lo Demut Ha-Guf? Does the Bible’s God Have a Body? Can a human see God? Part one will utilize texts from Isaiah 6, Ezekiel 1-3, Exodus 33-34, Jeremiah 1, Genesis 1, Genesis 3, Exodus 24, and Amos 9 to explore these questions.

mp3 iTunes

The Bodies of God and the World of Ancient Israel: Part II

How Many Bodies Does God Have? Part two will utilize selected Babylonian and Canaanite texts and selections from Genesis, Exodus, and Hosea to explore this question.

mp3 iTunes

The Bodies of God and the World of Ancient Israel: Part III

Just One! Just One! Part three will examine The Shem and the Kavod: the Shema, Solomon’s Prayer, other deuteronomic texts, Exodus 39-40, and Ezekiel 8-10.

mp3 iTunes

The Bodies of God and the World of Ancient Israel: Part IV

God’s Body and Our Own Judaism: Part four will utilize selected New Testament texts, kabbalistic texts, the Anim Zemirot, and the Yigdal.

mp3 iTunes

Benjamin D. Sommer is Professor of Bible and Ancient Semitic Languages at the Jewish Theological Seminary, and author of The Bodies of God and the World of Ancient Israel (CUP, 2009).

George B. Caird Lectures (1979-82)

Courtesy of Jeffrey B. Gibson and additional work by Matthew D. Montonini and Mark Goodacre “sixty-one of George B. Caird’s lectures on New Testament Theology were recorded from 1979-1982, at Oxford University, where Caird served as the Dean Ireland’s Professor of the Exegesis of Holy Scripture until his untimely passing in 1984.” They are available as audio and links are given on Montonini’s blog, New Testament Perspectives. Caird’s lectures cover issues such as New Testament theology, Pauline theology, Romans, and the Synoptic Problem.

In Our Time: Online and Podcasts (BBC Radio 4)

In Our Time is a BBC Radio 4 programme on the history of ideas and is presented by Melvyn Bragg. Its range of episodes are classified under the headings ‘Religion’, ‘History’, ‘Culture’, ‘Philosophy’, and ‘Science’. The format consists of Bragg asking questions to, and leading a discussion with, a panel of academics. There are over 600 episodes – either for listening online and/or download – and the full archive is available here. There are numerous episodes covering topics in biblical studies and relevant areas:

Prophecy (13 June, 2013)

Gnosticism (2 May, 2013)

King Solomon (7 June, 2012)

Judas Maccabeus (24 November, 2011)

The Dawn of the Iron Age (24 March, 2011)

The City [Part 1] (25 March 2010)

The Augustan Age (11 June 2009)

St Paul (28 May, 2009)

Miracles (25 September, 2008)

The Greek Myths (13 March, 2008)

Hell (21 December, 2006)

Heaven (22 December, 2005)

Archaeology and Imperialism (14 April 2005)

Angels (24 March, 2005)

Zoroastrianism (11 November, 2004)

Babylon (3 June 2004)

The Fall (8 April, 2004)

The Alphabet (18 December, 2003)

The Devil (11 December, 2003)

The Apocalypse (17 July, 2003)

The Lindisfarne Gospels (20 February, 2003)

The Soul (6 June 2002)

In addition to the episodes listed above, there are episodes on a range of topics and individuals which will be directly relevant to certain areas of biblical studies research (e.g. Plato, Pliny, Roman satire, Wyclif, Erasmus, Milton, historiography, cultural memory).