Free Online Conference: The Dead Sea Scrolls in Recent Scholarship

The Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University (NYU) is hosting a free, four-day online conference, “The Dead Sea Scrolls in Recent Scholarship”, May 17-20, 2020.

Register for each day of the conference here.

70 Years of Discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls

On August 6, 2017, at the 17th World Congress of Jewish Studies, Jerusalem, the first plenary session celebrated “70 Years of Discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls”. The four papers look at various ways in which the Dead Sea Scrolls enhance our knowledge of early Jewish literature.

Chairperson: Esther Chazon

Devorah Dimant: The Dead sea Scrolls and the Jewish Apocryphal Literature

Emmanuel Tov: The Exegesis of the Bible Enriched by the Dead Sea Scrolls

Hindy Najman: Rethinking the Contours of the Biblical Corpus through the Lens of the Dead Sea Scrolls

Michael Segal: On Writing and Rewriting in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls

Sidnie White Crawford, “The History of Qumran and its Library: A New Synthesis”

Professor Sidnie White Crawford (University of Nebraska-Lincoln) summarises the latest scholarship on the Qumran library of 800-900 fragmentary manuscripts from the mid-third century BCE to the late first century CE, and the history of the sect responsible for the collection and its scribal/learned characteristics. Her public lecture was delivered on January 25, 2018, on the occasion of receiving a D.Theol honoris causa from the University of Uppsala.

Matthias Henze: The Resurrection of the Dead in Early Judaism and Christianity

Dr. Matthias Henze (Rice University) delivers a lecture on the topic, “In the Company of Angels: The Resurrection of the Dead in Early Judaism and Christianity,” recorded at Trinity University on March 2, 2017 (lecture begins at 4:36).

Jews and Christians share the belief that at the end of time God will raise the dead and make them live again. Some early Jewish and Christian writers went even further and anticipated a life among the angels. What do we know about the origin of this belief? The hope for the resurrection of the dead did not originate with Christianity, as is often claimed, but has deep roots in ancient Judaism. This talk will trace the origins of the belief in the resurrection from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament through Judaism of the Second Temple period into the New Testament. Only when the New Testament texts about the resurrection are read side by side with the ancient Jewish texts about the end of time can we fully appreciate what the two religions have in common and where they differ.

Lawrence Schiffman – 2006 Stroum Lectures: The Religion of The Dead Sea Scrolls

Professor Lawrence Schiffman (University of Chicago) delivered the 1990 Stroum Lectures in Jewish Studies at the University of Washington, “Creation, Revelation, and Redemption: The Religion of The Dead Sea Scrolls”.

Lecture 1: God, Humanity & The Universe in the Dead Sea Scrolls

Lecture 2: Scripture, Law & The Life of the Dead Sea Sect

Lecture 3: Apocalyptics, Messiahs, and the End of Days

Peter Flint on the Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament

The late African biblical scholar Dr. Peter Flint delivers a lecture introducing the Dead Sea Scrolls and their relevance for understanding the New Testament, on January 16, 2012 at El Shaddai Ministries, Tacoma, WA.

Re-Imagining the Scriptural Past in the Dead Sea Scrolls: TWU Dead Sea Scrolls Institute

On February 23, 2016, the Trinity Western University (TWU) Dead Sea Scrolls Institute hosted a series of talks on the Dead Sea Scrolls, “Re-Imagining the Scriptural Past in the Dead Sea Scrolls”.

The Dead Sea Scrolls provide fresh perspective on both the words of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and ancient Jewish world of the New Testament. As the library of a specialized Jewish scribal community, they also reveal how ancient people and communities rendered their religious traditions relevant to their own culture. Many readers of the Bible today face this same task: scripture is at once ancient and sacred, yet its contemporary relevance is not always evident. Through presentations and discussions with four TWU alumni and authors of recently published books on the Dead Sea Scrolls, our evening will explore how the group that penned and preserved the scrolls navigated this dynamic in their own search for meaning. Join authors Dr. Andrew Perrin, Dr. Kipp Davis, Dr. Marvin Miller, Dr. Dongshin Chang, and Dr. Peter Flint as they detail how ancient writers encountered and innovated the biblical past by extending prophecy, claiming revelatory dreams, rethinking covenant theology, and crafting and circulating letters.

Dr. Peter Flint – The Dead Sea Scrolls: What Can They Teach Us?

Dr. Peter Flint (Canada Research Chair in Dead Sea Scrolls Studies at Trinity Western University) provides a fresh introduction to the Qumran texts and archaeology in light of his recently published book “The Dead Sea Scrolls” (Abingdon, 2013).

Dr. Andrew Perrin – History Revealed: The Eras of Empires in Daniel and Beyond

Dr. Andrew Perrin (Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Trinity Western University) explores the rewriting of apocalyptic history in the book of Daniel and ancient Judaism in light of his recently published book “The Dynamics of Dream-Vision Revelation in the Aramaic Dead Sea Scrolls” (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2015).

Dr. Kipp Davis – Forging Reputations of National Icons: Chuck Norris and the Prophet Jeremiah

Dr. Kipp Davis (Scholar in Residence at Trinity Western University) details the cultural and literary development of famed figures today and in antiquity, with an eye to the prophet Jeremiah’s life beyond the Bible. A detailed treatment of the Jeremiah traditions in the Dead Sea Scrolls may be found in his recently published book “The Cave 4 Apocryphon of Jeremiah and the Qumran Jeremianic Traditions: Prophetic Persona and the Construction of Community Identity” (Brill, 2014).

Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls, with Andrew B. Perrin

deadseascrolls-perrin

Trinity Western University have made public a series of videos developed primarily for students enrolled in the “Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls” (RELS 320) course, lectured by Dr Andrew B. Perrin in 2015.

The course provides an introduction to the Dead Sea scrolls within the context of early Judaism.

 

Welcome to RELS 320, Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls, at Trinity Western University

6:19
1.1 Orientation to Ancient Judaism

25:25
1.2 Survey of Qumran Library

38:29
  1.3 Qumran Archaeology

46:29
1.4 ReDiscoveries in the Judaean Desert: New Dead Sea Scrolls Finds

20:20
2.1 Jewish Groups and Qumran Identity: Pharisees, Sadducees, or Essenes?

47:02
2.2 A Sketch of Qumran Practice and Belief

49:56
3.1 The Scope and Shape of Scripture among the Dead Sea Scrolls

44:41
3.2 Insights on the Evolution of Scriptural Commentary from the Dead Sea Scrolls

36:43
4.1 Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha at Qumran

32:08
4.2 The Dead Sea Scrolls, Jesus, Paul, and the New Testament

31:43

Reclaiming Jewish History – Colloquium 1997, International Institute for Secular Humanistic Judaism

The 1997 Colloquium for the International Institute for Secular Humanistic Judaism (IISHJ) included a number of presentations on the Hebrew Bible and early Judaism. These are now available on YouTube:

Carol Meyers, “Origins of Ancient Israel”

Panel response to Carol Meyers

William Propp, “Origins of the Bible”

Panel response to William Propp

Eric Meyers, “From the Maccabees to the Dead Sea Scrolls”

Panel response to Eric Meyers

Ari Elon, “Origins of the Halakha”

Panel response to Ari Elon

Emanuel Tov – The Biblical Dead Sea Scrolls

Professor Emanuel Tov delivered a guest lecture in Scott Chapel, Oklahoma Christian University, in April 2014. The topic was the biblical texts among the scrolls at Qumran.

There is also a heartwarming chat with Oklahoma Christian president John deSteiguer to talk about his childhood, career, and calling:

Evil in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity

Videos are available of some of the speakers at the Evil in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity conference, St Mary’s College, Twickenham, May 23-24, 2014.

Prof Loren Stuckenbruck, “How Much Does the Christ Event Solve? Evil in New Testament Theology and Its Relation to Jewish Theology”

Prof Christopher Rollston, “The Rise of the Satan in Early Second Temple Judaism”

Dr Jutta Leonhardt-Balzer, “Evil at Qumran”

Dr Chris Tilling, “Paul, Evil, and Justification Debates”

Dr Tommy Wasserman, “Variants of Evil in the New Testament”

Dr Christopher Skinner, “Overcoming Satan, Overcoming the World: Exploring the Cosmologies of Mark and John”

Christian Beginnings and The Dead Sea Scrolls (Hayward Lectures 2004)

A special edition of the 2004 Hayward Lecture series was held on the topic of “Christian Beginnings and the Dead Sea Scrolls”, at Acadia Divinity College. Articles developed from the lecture series were later published in John J. Collins and Craig A. Evans, eds, Christian Beginnings and the Dead Sea Scrolls (Baker Academic, 2006).

John J. Collins, “A Messiah before Jesus?”

Craig A. Evans, “Jesus, John, and the Dead Sea Scrolls: Assessing Typologies of Restoration”

Martin Abegg, “Paul and James on the Law in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls”

Peter Flint, “The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Biblical Canon”

Glenn Wooden, “Guided by God: Divine Aid in Interpretation in the Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament”

Barry Smith, “‘Spirit of Holiness’: An Eschatological Principle of Obedience”

Panel discussion

Online Critical Pseudepigrapha (OCP)


ocr

The Online Critical Pseudepigrapha (OCP) provides open-access, online critical editions of various Jewish and Christian pseudepigrapha. OCP is a publication of the Society of Biblical Literature (SBL).

To date, the site provides critical editions (with critical apparatuses, which show variants in the various manuscripts) for some works, and provides other texts without critical apparatuses. The project is ongoing, so “readers should consult the ‘text status’ information on the introductory page for each document to determine whether a better or more complete text exists elsewhere.”

The current available texts are:
Texts with critical apparatus
2 (Syriac Apocalypse of) Baruch
The Testament of Job
1 Enoch (In progress)
Testament of Adam (In progress)
Texts without critical apparatus
Testament of Abraham
The Life of Adam and Eve
Visions of Amram
The Letter of Aristeas
Aristeas the Exegete
Aristobulus
Artapanus
3 (Greek Apocalypse of) Baruch
4 Baruch (Paraleipomena Ieremiou)
Cleodemus Malchus
Eldad and Modad
Eupolemus
The Apocryphon of Ezekiel
Ezekiel the Tragedian
Vision of Ezra
The History of the Rechabites
Jubilees
The Lives of the Prophets
Assumption of Moses (Testament of Moses)
3 Maccabees
4 Maccabees
Philo the Epic Poet
Pseudo-Eupolemus
Testament of Solomon
Theodotus

Michael Satlow – From Israelite to Jew

Professor Michael Satlow, of Brown University, offers a complete set of lectures on early Judaism (recorded 2011), available for free download on iTunes. The course, “From Israelite to Jew” covers the exile, return from exile, Persian, Hellenistic, and Roman periods, including Philo, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the destruction of the Temple.

 Name   Description   Released   Price 

 Episode 1 – Between Faith and Reason–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 2 – The Religion of Israel–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 3 – Exile–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 4 – Return–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 5 – Ezra–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 The Hedgehog, the Fox, and the Talmud–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 6 – The Torah–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 7 – Nehemiah–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
Episode 8 – Jews of the Persian Empire–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 9 – Hellenism Arrives–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 10 – Jubilees and 1 Enoch–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 11 – The Revolt of the Maccabees–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 12 – The Hasmonean Kings–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 13 – Origins of Jewish Sectarianism–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 14 – Hellenistic Judaism–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 15 – Herod the Great–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 16 – Philo–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 17 – The Dead Sea Scrolls–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 18 – Jesus and Other Strange Jews–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 19 – Josephus–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 20 – The First Century–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 21 – Destruction–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
 Episode 22 – After the Destruction: A Beginning or an End?–1/4/11 Free View In iTunes
Professor Michael L. Satlow specializes in Early Judaism and has written extensively on issues of gender, sexuality, and marriage among Jews in antiquity, as well as on the Dead Sea scrolls, Jewish theology, methodology in Religious Studies, and the social history of Jews during the rabbinic period. His latest book is entitled Creating Judaism.

Geza Vermes on the Dead Sea Scrolls

The following is a talk by Geza Vermes on ‘The Story of the Dead Sea Scrolls’.

The Story of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a lecture presented by Professor Geza Vermes at Louisiana State University’s Hill Memorial Library on September 29, 2009. Geza Vermes was born at Mako in Hungary in 1924. He studied in Budapest and in Louvain (Belgium), where he read Theology and Oriental history and languages, and in 1953 obtained a doctorate with a dissertation on the historical framework of the Dead Sea Scrolls.