Memory and the Reception of Jesus in Early Christianity

The Memory and the Reception of Jesus in Early Christianity Conference was held on Friday 10th to Saturday 11th June 2016, at St Mary’s University, Twickenham. Some of the lectures from this conference are now available on YouTube:

Day 1

Chris Keith (read by Steve Walton), “The Memory Approach and the Reception of Jesus”

Christine Jacobi, “The Reception of Jesus in Paul”

Discussion after Keith and Jacobi

Richard Bauckham, “The Psychology of Eyewitness Memory”

Helen Bond, “The Reception of Jesus in the Gospel of John”

Discussion after Bauckham and Bond

Jens Schroeter, “Memory and Theories of History” [lecture is incomplete: cuts off early]

Day 2

Samuel Byrskog, “Memory and Narrative”

Sandra Hübenthal, “The Reception of Jesus in Mark’s Gospel”

Discussion after Byrskog and Hübenthal

Alan Kirk, “Memory and Media”

Joan Taylor, “The Reception of Images of Jesus Prior to Constantine”

Discussion after Kirk and Taylor

Ruben Zimmermann, “Memory, Identity, and Mimetic Ethics”

James Crossley, “The Reception of Jesus in Talmudic Literature”

Discussion after Zimmermann and Crossley

Rafael Rodríguez, “Memory and Liturgy”

Anthony Le Donne, “Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future of the Memory Approach”

Panel Discussion

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Larry Hurtado on Early High Christology and the New Testament God

Larry-HurtadoProfessor Larry Hurtado (University of Edinburgh) discusses his views on the development of Christology and the concept of God in the New Testament, in two podcasts on Trinities.org.

1. (Podcast 99) “Dr. Larry Hurtado on early high christology” (begins at 10:50)

mp3 Stitcher iTunes

Dr. Hurtado explains the term “early high christology” and what it means when applied to his own work. He discusses various angels and men who in various ancient Jewish writings are in some way exalted and honored in God-like ways, and how these cases differ from that of Jesus. Dr. Hurtado has argued that in the early years of Christianity we suddenly see a distinctive pattern of Jesus-worship, as evidenced by the earliest books in the New Testament. Such practices don’t derive from a second or third century, Gentile Christian context, but rather from the earliest, largely Jewish Christian context.

Hurtado discusses this in light of various passages in the gospel according to John, and also the statements of 1 Timothy that God is immortal. (1:17,6:16) The New Testament, he observes, emphasizes that Jesus was a genuine human being, a man, although in his view it also presents Jesus as existing even when the world was made, in a pre-human phase of his existence. God and Jesus, in his view, are closely linked, but also distinguished in the New Testament. God exalts Jesus to divine glory, which is why we must worship Jesus, according to early Christians. Worship of Jesus, he argues, has a theocentric (God-centered) justification or basis.

He also comments briefly on James Dunn’s Did the First Christians Worship Jesus?, the idea that “worship” by definition can be given only to God, and whether we should start our christological thinking with fourth century or with first century sources.

2. (Podcast 100) “Dr. Larry Hurtado on God in New Testament Theology

mp3 Stitcher iTunes

I talk with Dr. Hurtado about his book God in New Testament Theology. He talks about

  • the theocentric basis of New Testament christology
  • what the New Testament adds to the theology of the Old Testament
  • God as “Father”
  • the way Christians view God in relation to Jesus
  • whether we need to interact with God through a mediator
  • the New Testament picture of God as love and yet as dangerous, and of Jesus as both savior and judge – and both as sources of agape love
  • how the NT picture of God differs from the theologies of pagan deities
  • how recently, and even in ancient times, in popular thinking Jesus can eclipse God in Christians’ minds, becoming a friendlier, less threatening god than the Father
  • ho theos vs. theos in early Christianity, and how the NT and early texts distinguish between Jesus and the one God (aka the Father)
  • whether or not the NT authors rethink how Judaic monotheism should be understood
  • the “dyadic devotional pattern” we see in NT-era worship practice, and whether this violated the first commandment
  • the sense in which Yahweh is unique, according to the Bible
  • whether Dr. Hurtado would agree with the suggestion that Jesus is “a part of” God
  • how the NT as it were “redefines” God with reference to Jesus
  • whether or not in his view Dr. Hurtado’s work supports “social” (three-self) Trinity theories
  • that contemporary theology has tended to neglect the literature of the first three Christian centuries in favor of the “classics” of the 4th and 5th centuries
  • Dr. Richard Bauckham’s “christology of divine identity” as an attempt to make sense of the NT apart from later “ontological” ways of approaching the matter

Richard Bauckham on Eyewitness Testimony, Mark’s Geography, and Wild Animals

Professor Richard Bauckham (University of St Andrews) delivered three lectures at Laidlaw College on August 7-9, 2015.

The Authenticity of the Apostolic Eyewitness in the New Testament

Mark’s Geography and the origin of Mark’s Gospel

Jesus and the Wild

Wilderness is a term that elicits both fear and delight. It is in the wilderness that we recognise our vulnerability as humans and also our interconnectedness with other non-human life. Yet, we live in an age where wilderness is rapidly disappearing. Ancient forests are cut-down, mountain-tops levelled, and surging rivers are tamed, as human civilisation spreads across the globe. Does Jesus, whose earthly ministry begins in the wilderness (Mark 1:12-13), care about this loss of wild areas? What would Jesus do about climate-change, acidifying oceans, habitat destruction and species extinction?

Karl Barth and the Gospels: The 2015 Annual Karl Barth Conference

2015-Karl-Barth-Conference

The 2015 Annual Karl Barth Conference took place on June 21-24, 2015 at Princeton Theological Seminary. Participants discuss the reception history of the Gospels in the theological speculations of Karl Barth, and contribute to the further reception history of theological interpretation of the Gospels.

Sunday, June 21

Opening Lecture, Jürgen Moltmann—“Predestination: Karl Barth’s Doctrine of the Election of Grace” (Miller Chapel)

with Q&A session

Monday, June 22

Eric Gregory—“‘The Gospel within the commandment’: Karl Barth on the Parable of the Good Samaritan” followed by a panel discussion with Eric Gregory, Jürgen Moltmann, and Daniel L. Migliore (Auditorium);
Willie Jennings—“A Rich Disciple? Karl Barth on the Rich Young Ruler” (Auditorium)

Conclusion of Willie Jennings’ paper

Paul Dafydd Jones—“The Riddle of Gethsemane” (Auditorium)

Karlfried Froehlich—“Karl Barth and the Isenheim Altarpiece” (Auditorium)

Tuesday, June 23

Bruce L. McCormack—“The Passion of God Himself: the Cry of Dereliction in Barth’s Theology” (Auditorium)

Beverly Gaventa—“Reading Karl Barth’s Reading of the Road to Emmaus” (Auditorium)

Richard Bauckham—“Karl Barth’s Interpretation of the Prologue to John’s Gospel” (Auditorium)

Richard Bauckham on the Geography and Culture of Galilee and Its Fishers

bauckham

Dr Richard Bauckham (University of St Andrews) delivered the 2014 Thomas Burns Memorial Lectures on ‘The Sons of Zebedee: The Lives of Two Galilean Fishers’, at the University of Otago. The lectures provide a detailed examination of the geographical-social context of Galilee in the time of Jesus.

The lectures are available on iTunes, and are downloadable in mp4 video and mp3 audio formats:
1) The World of the Lake of Galilee’ – Tuesday 12 August (video) (audio)
2) ‘The Fishing Industry’ – Wednesday 13 August (video) (audio)
3) ‘Zebedee and Sons’ – Thursday 14 August (video) (audio)
4) ‘Called to Fish for People’ – Tuesday 19 August (video) (audio)
5) ‘Sons of Thunder’ – Wednesday 20 August (video) (audio)
6) ‘Jerusalem’ – Thursday 21 August (video) (audio)

Richard Bauckham debunks Simcha Jacobovici’s The Lost Gospel

jacobovici

Professor Richard Bauckham provides a response to the recent book by conspiracy theorist Simcha Jacobovici, The Lost Gospel: Decoding the Sacred Text That Reveals Jesus’ Marriage to Mary the Magdalene (HarperCollins, 2014).

Jacobovici (a journalist infamous for peddling various conspiracy theories about Jesus) claims to have discovered the secret key to interpret Joseph and Aseneth – a well-known ancient Jewish work. For Jacobovici, and his co-author Barrie Wilson, it is all a coded message about Jesus and Mary Magdalene (who are not mentioned in the text).

Richard Bauckham provides an online refutation of Jacobovici’s conspiracy theory, “Assessing The Lost Gospel“:

Part 1: The Chronicle of Pseudo-Zachariah Rhetor – Content and Context
Part 2: Misinterpreting Ephrem
Part 3: Misreading Joseph and Aseneth (i)
Part 4: Responding to Simcha’s Responses (responding to Jacobovici’s response one and response two)
Part 5: Misreading Joseph and Aseneth (ii)
Part 6: On Mary Magdalene and Magdala
Part 7: Conclusion and Pauline Postscript

h/t: Mark Goodacre (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 67)

critical-praise

Richard Bauckham with Chris Marshall: Jesus in Context Conference

Professor Richard Bauckham and Dr Chris Marshall presented a lecture series on the historical Jesus, at Carey College, 7-8 August 2014.

 

Richard Bauckham, “The World of the Lake of Galilee”

Richard Bauckham, “The Fishing Industry”

Richard Bauckham, “The Historical Jesus”

Interview with Richard Bauckham

Chris Marshall, “A Parable of Restorative Justice”

Interview with Chris Marshall

Richard Bauckham: Lectures on Jesus and the Gospels

Richard Bauckham

Professor Richard Bauckham’s personal website provides the document files of several unpublished lectures and unpublished essays on Jesus and the Gospels. There are further links to audio and video files of a number of lectures and discussions on Jesus and the Gospels, with the audio of one lecture apiece on Revelation and ecology.

Bauckham is the author of several works on Jesus and the Gospels, including Jesus and the Eyewitnesses (2006). Until 2007 he was Professor of New Testament Studies at the University of St Andrews.

According to the phonetic system used by the Oxford English Dictionary, Bauckham is pronounced Borkem…. For readers in the UK it may help to say that Bauckham rhymes with Morecambe, the name of the great English comedian Eric Morecambe of the duo Morecambe and Wise.
– “How to pronounce the name BAUCKHAM