David Noel Freedman – 1989 Stone Lectures: “The Prophets of the Eighth Century, B.C.E.”

Professor David Noel Freedman (1922-2008) delivered the 1989 Stone Lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary, on the topic of “The Prophets of the Eighth Century, B.C.E.”.

The five lectures are available in mp3 (audio) format:

  1. “Canonical Considerations and Literary-Critical Criteria”
  2. “The Minor Prophets I: Amos of Tekoa”
  3. The Minor Prophets II: Hosea ben-Beeri and Micah the Morashtite
  4. “The Major Prophet: Isaiah ben-Amoz”
  5. “Summary and Summation: the Fifth and Final Prophet–Jonah”

Martin Hengel – 1987 Stone Lectures: “The Johannine Question”

Professor Martin Hengel (1926-2009) delivered the 1987 Stone Lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary, on the topic of “The Bible as the Scriptures of the Church”.

The four lectures are available in mp3 (audio) format:

  1. “The Historical Background of the Author and His Gospel, and Questions of HisIdentification”
  2. “The Elder John and the Second and Third Letters of John”
  3. “The First Letter of John and the Schism of the School”
  4. “The Beloved Disciple, the Johannine School, and the Unity of the Gospel”

Brevard Childs – 1981 Stone Lectures: “The Bible as the Scriptures of the Church”

Professor Brevard Childs (1923-2007) delivered the 1981 Stone Lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary, on the topic of “The Bible as the Scriptures of the Church”.

The five lectures are available in mp3 (audio) format:

  1. “The Present Impasse in the Study of the Bible”
  2. “The Canonical Problem of the New Testament”
  3. “The Canonical Shape of the Gospels”
  4. “The Unity of the Fourfold Witness”
  5. “Biblical Theology in the Context of the Christian Canon”

Eva Mroczek: Marginalia Interview on The Literary Imagination in Jewish Antiquity

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Joseph Ryan Kelly (Marginalia) speaks with Dr Eva Mroczek (University of California Davis) about her new book The Literary Imagination in Jewish Antiquity (OUP, 2016). The interview was first broadcast on October 25, 2016.

There was no such thing as the Bible when ancient Jewish literature was composed. With a more expansive view of sources, we can glimpse our way into a completely different picture of how ancient people might have imagined their own literary world.

 

Paula Fredriksen: Jesus, Paul, and the Origins of Christianity

In 2000, Professor Paula Fredriksen (Boston University) delivered a lecture in the Princeton centenary lecture series, Frontiers of Knowledge, on the topic of “Jesus, Paul, and the Origins of Christianity”.

She is introduced by Professor Martha Himmelfarb (Princeton University). Professor Fredriksen’s talk begins at 5:50.

Sidnie White Crawford on the Dead Sea Scrolls and Composition of the Bible

Here is a collection of lectures given by Professor Sidnie White Crawford (University of Nebraska-Lincoln) on the subject of the Dead Sea Scrolls and what they tell us about the composition of the Bible.

 

“The Rewritten Bible at Qumran” (4Q Reworked Pentateuch)

“What Do the Dead Sea Scrolls Teach Us About The Bible?”

“The Dead Seas Scrolls After 60 Years: What Have We Learned?”

“The Qumran Collection of Texts as a Scribal Collection”

Sharon Keller: Sex, Magic, and Death in the Hebrew Bible

Dr Sharon Keller (Hofstra University) delivers talks on Sex, Death, and Magic. The lecture was part of the Orange County Community Scholars Program (OCCSP), podcasted January 5-31, 2016.

The talks are available in m4a audio format:

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Johanna Stiebert on Sex between Brothers and Sisters in the Bible and Rape Culture

Associate Professor Johanna Stiebert (University of Leeds) explores sex between brothers and sisters in “Exploring Connections between Rape Culture and the Hebrew Bible: Brother and Sister and Sex in Biblical Text and Popular Culture”, a paper delivered at the University of Chester on June 1, 2016.

Associate Professor Stiebert is the author of First-Degree Incest and the Hebrew Bible: Sex in the Family (Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2016), which deals in more detail with the same topic.

Larry Hurtado on Early Christian Distinctiveness in the Roman World

On September 10, 2016, Professor Larry Hurtado (University of Edinburgh) delivered a lecture at the Lanier Theological Library in Houston, Texas: “A New and Mischievous Superstition: Early Christianity in the Roman World”.

The lecture covers material from his recent book, Destroyer of the Gods: Early Christian Distinctiveness in the Roman World (Waco: Baylor University Press, September 2016).

In the Roman world in which Christianity first emerged it was viewed as different and dangerous. And Christianity was distinctive. Christian’s were called atheists and regarded as impious, because they refused to worship the traditional gods. Unlike other religious groups of the day, they had no shrines, altars, images or priests. Reading and disseminating texts were central activities. Early Christianity comprised a new kind of religious identity that wasn’t tied to ethnicity. Unlike traditional Roman-era religion, Christianity also made ethics central. But, ironically, all these things that made early Christianity distinctive, even odd, in the ancient Roman world, have become commonplace assumptions about “religion” for us. This lecture addresses our cultural amnesia, showing how early Christianity helped to challenge the ancient world and helped to shape our world.

Destroyer of the Gods was also the subject of a panel discussion at Lanier Theological Library, on September 9, 2016. The panel included Carey Newman (Baylor University Press), Rubel Shelly (Lipscomb University), and Christian Eberhart (University of Houston), with Mark Lanier as Moderator.

Further, Professor Hurtado is interviewed about Destroyer of the Gods by:

Professor Hurtado also notes his article in Catalyst, which draws on some of the material in Destroyer of the Gods: “The Distinctiveness of Early Christianity” (October 5, 2016).

Bookish Circles: Teaching and learning in the ancient Mediterranean

Videos are available from a colloquium held at Heythrop College, University of London from 29th-30th July 2016 on the topic of literacy and education in the ancient world: “Bookish Circles: Teaching and learning in the ancient Mediterranean”.

Friday 29th July 2016

Jonathan Norton, Director of the Heythrop Centre for Textual Studies, Introduction

Sacha Stern, University College London, “Literacy, teaching and learning in Rabbinic Judaism”

Jonathan Gorsky, Heythrop College London, “Torah piety: The development of Torah learning as a focal religious endeavour” [no video]

Ingo Kottsieper, Westphalian Wilhelms University, Münster,   “Literacy and Aramaic as written language in the Achaemenid Empire”

James K. Aitken, University of Cambridge, “Learning among Jewish social groups in Ptolemaic Egypt”

Joan Taylor, King’s College London, “4Q341: A Writing Exercise Remembered”

Saturday 30th July 2016 

Sean Adams, University of Glasgow, “Sympotic learning: Symposia literature and cultural education”

Sean Ryan, Heythrop College London, “Greco-Roman education, ‘mental libraries’, and the Book of Revelation”

Steve Smith, University of Chichester, “Reading the New Testament in the Context of Other Texts: a Relevance Theory Perspective”

Jonathan Norton, “…not beyond what is written:  How Paul uses literacy to manipulate social differential”

Mark Nanos on the Translation of Romans 11

On March 24, 2014 at Westmont College, Mark D. Nanos (Rockhurst University, Kansas City) probes the identity of the Apostle Paul in a lecture entitled, “Paul’s Relationship to Jews and Judaism in First-Century Context: Revisiting the Translation of Romans 11”.

“Romans 11 continues to be a central text for Christian perceptions of Jews and Judaism,” Nanos says. “Current translations give the impression that Paul was a Christian who perceived Jews who did not believe in Jesus as Christ to be hardened and cut off from the covenants God made with Abraham and Israel, as if Judaism no longer represented Paul’s own identity.”

Nanos will explain why these are not the most accurate choices for interpreting Paul’s message in its original first-century context. He will also explore how a new approach to Paul’s message from within Judaism can contribute to advancing Christian-Jewish relations today.

 

Lawrence Schiffman – 2006 Stroum Lectures: The Religion of The Dead Sea Scrolls

Professor Lawrence Schiffman (University of Chicago) delivered the 1990 Stroum Lectures in Jewish Studies at the University of Washington, “Creation, Revelation, and Redemption: The Religion of The Dead Sea Scrolls”.

Lecture 1: God, Humanity & The Universe in the Dead Sea Scrolls

Lecture 2: Scripture, Law & The Life of the Dead Sea Sect

Lecture 3: Apocalyptics, Messiahs, and the End of Days

Michael Fishbane – 1990 Stroum Lectures: This Kiss of God: Spiritual Death in Jewish Religious History

Professor Michael Fishbane (University of Chicago) delivered the 1990 Stroum Lectures in Jewish Studies at the University of Washington: “This Kiss of God: Spiritual Death in Jewish Religious History”.

Lecture 1 (April 24, 1990), “Paths of Ascent to God in Jewish Spirituality”:

Lecture 2 (April 26, 1990), “The Martyr & the Mystic”:

Lecture 3 (April 30, 1990), “Rituals of Prayer and Sanctification”: