Ward Blanton, Paul, Invisible Committee, Agamben, and Anarchism

The following video is a lecture by Ward Blanton (University of Kent) “Paul, Apostle of the Anarchists: The Invisible Committee, Agamben, and Anti-Terror Legislation”.

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BSO7a-b Interview with Kaya Mar

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The latest BSO podcast is James Crossley interviewing the artist and political satirist Kaya Mar which took place on 3 May, 2016. Due to some minor technical hitches, the interview is in two parts. The first short part (BSO7a) is effectively the intro while the second part (BSO7b) is the bulk of the interview. The interview covers the biblical topics such as Jesus-Corbyn comparisons, a number of political paintings with biblical themes listed below, and José Saramago’s novels on Christian origins, as well as other issues such as the political functions of the artist. The interviews can be streamed or downloaded here and should be available on iTunes shortly:

BSO7a Interview with Kaya Mar (Intro; 2:47)

BSO7b Interview with Kaya Mar (Main; 35:05)

Kaya Mar’s work features on the front of a recently updated version of a book on the Bible in English political discourse since 1968:

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Mar’s work ranges from landscapes through portraits to political satire. The Bible and religion feature regularly as plenty of examples from Mar’s website show (including those mentioned in the podcast). Readers might want to look at ‘The Birth of Gideon’, ‘Jeremy Corbyn: Labour’s Unwanted Child’, ‘Crucifying the NHS’, ‘Saint Kate’, ‘Madman Martyred to Imperialism’, ‘Attending King David on His Throne’, ‘The Occupy Tent City at St Paul’s Cathedral’, and ‘The Massacre of the Kurds’ (and many, many more).

Here is some more information on Kaya Mar:

WTCLive Episode with N.T. Wright

The following is a WTCLive interview with N.T Wright who is described as a ‘legendary New Testament scholar’ (cf. Matt. 27.52-53).

N.T. Wright discusses his recent 1700pg tome Paul and the Faithfulness of God (Fortress Press/SPCK, 2013) and his more recent book The Paul Debate (Baylor/SPCK, 2015) in which he responds to critiques of his big book on Paul. Wright also discusses the implications of his work on Paul for the Church and marketplace.

Christopher Hill on the Seventeenth-century English Bible

‘The expressed idea was to have in every parish in the country an educated parson who’d been at Oxford or Cambridge and so hadn’t a dangerous idea in his head who would guide the reading of the Bible’ (Christopher Hill)

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The following is an interview with the historian of seventeenth-century England, Christopher Hill (1912-2003), on BBC Radio Four for ‘Conversations with Historians’. The interviewer is John Miller. No date is given but it must be from the early 1990s as it mentions John Major’s government and that it is ’35, 34 years’ since he left the Communist Party (c. 1956/57).The use of the Bible, including the use of the Bible in the regicide, is found at 5.53-8.22 and 15.35-18.00, and issues of god and religion are present throughout.

Hill was a prolific writer and wrote a lot on the uses of Bible, including The English Bible and the Seventeenth-Century Revolution (1993). There is an extended discussion of Hill’s use of the Bible in his academic work at Harnessing Chaos.

Biblical Studies Online podcast: An interview with Ward Blanton on Paul, politics and philosophy

wardblantonThe latest Biblical Studies Online podcast (BSO06) is now available on iTunes for download here or, for non-iTunes users, here. It is an interview with Ward Blanton, Reader in Biblical Cultures and European Thought, University of Kent. Blanton talks about Paul, politics, philosophy, Jewishness, revolutionary thinking, Pauline studies, and his book, A Materialism for the Masses: St Paul and the Philosophy of Undying Life (Columbia University Press, 2014).

Lloyd Pietersen and an Anarchist Reading of Romans 13

From the Dead Letters and Living Words conference at Newman University:

The question about what is the relationship between church and state is one that has repeatedly been raised throughout Christian history. Romans 13 is a key passage in this debate and is often quoted to endorse a pacific and accepting attitude by the church towards state authority and rule. Is Paul, a frequent and hostile critic of the Roman Empire who spends much of the time contrasting it unfavourably with the new empire being established through Jesus Christ in the church, really saying that either the church should accept the dictates and of the state? [Lloyd] Pietersen’s paper challenges this reading…Pietersen presents a concise and extremely helpful introduction to the historical context of anarchism before exploring in greater detail the Christian anarchist tradition. He offers an anarchist perspective of the depiction of monarchy within the Hebrew Bible before introducing Tolstoy’s reading of the Sermon on the Mount (Matt 7:1-5) and an examination of Jesus as anarchist archetype. In the light of this, Pietersen then presents a very different reading of Romans 13 that considers its historical and literary contexts and in which Paul scathingly attacks the failures and injustices of Roman Imperialism.

Presentation notes are available here.

Steve Moyise on ‘Reimagining the Jewish Jesus’

From the Dead Letters and Living Words conference at Newman University:

Prof. Steve Moyise encouraged us to re-examine the Jewish Jesus in the paper ‘Reimagining the Jewish Jesus‘ which he presented at the Dead Letters & Living Words conference at Newman on 6th June 2015…

It is difficult to overstate the impact of Geza Vermes’ Jesus the Jew (1973) and E.P. Sanders’ Jesus and Judaism (1985) on New Testament and Historical Jesus studies. Although an awareness of Jesus’ Jewish background had long been a part of our consciousness, it was their work that drove it to our attention. Jesus could no longer be seen as being distinct from his Jewish background. In order to be fully understood, his life, work and teaching needed to be studied within the context of late Second Temple period Judaism.

In a typically entertaining and accessible paper, Moyise took three elements of Jesus’ teaching that are traditionally seen as being distinctively Christian in character and a discontinuity from the Judaism of his time:

  • The Son of Man is the Lord of the Sabbath
  • Jesus and the Food Laws
  • Jesus and the Second Coming

Moyise explored each in the light of their Jewish rather than Christian context, throwing light on how they would probably have been understood by the contemporaries of Jesus and, in doing so, challenging our assumptions and traditional understanding of them.

PowerPoint slides are available here.

Justin Meggitt’s website and online publications

The website of Justin Meggitt (Institute of Continuing Education, University of Cambridge) includes details of his projects such as the Origins of Christianity, Religion, Magic and Medicine in Antiquity, and Open Access and the Humanities. It also includes PDFs of publications, such as ‘Popular Mythology in the Early Empire and the Multiplicity of Jesus Traditions’ and ‘Taking the Emperor’s Clothes Seriously: The New Testament and The Roman Emperor’.

BSO Podcast: Chris Keith on Social Memory and Historical Jesus Studies

The latest BSO online interview is now available for download from iTunes or streaming from here. In BSO5 James Crossley interviews Chris Keith. Chris Keith is Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity and Director of the Centre for the Social-Scientific Study of the Bible at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, London.

BSO interviews Chris Keith, discussing some of the most contentious areas in historical Jesus studies today. This include: social memory, the so-called criteria of authenticity, form criticism, and various issues in historical Jesus studies.

Robert Alter on Translation of the Bible

The following are videos of lectures given by Robert Alter on translation of the Bible.

1. ‘Translating Biblical Poetry: Ancient Hebrew Verse and the Constraints of English’ (University of California, September 19, 2014)

2. ‘The Pleasure & Perils of Translating the Bible’ (University of California, March 26, 2012)

3. ‘Lost in Translation: The Challenge of Translating the Bible’ (Villanova University, September 15, 2008)

Public lecture by Christoph Markschies: ‘Origen and Paul: the example of their anthropologies’

Public lecture by Christoph Markschies on ‘Origen and Paul: the example of their anthropologies’ (recorded May 20, 2014; published December 18, 2014)

From the University of Chicago Divinity School:

A public lecture by Christoph Markschies, one of the world’s leading scholars of early Christian studies: “Origen and Paul: The Example of Their Anthropologies.” Markschies holds the Harnack Chair of Church History (Ancient Christianity) at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, where he also served as President from 2006-2010. Prof. Markschies studied Theology, Classics, and Philosophy in Marburg, Jerusalem, and Munich, and received his doctorate (1991) and Habilitation (1994) from the University of Tübingen. The recipient of multiple honorary doctorates, his many publications include seminal studies of such key figures as Valentinus, Origen and Ambrosius. Prof. Markschies is the Vice-President of the Berlin Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities and a member of the Academy of Erfurt and Heidelberg, the European Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Akademia Europea.

h/t Wayne Coppins

Eerdmans Author Interview Series

Eerdmans have a series of interviews with their authors, a number of whom are biblical scholars. Featured interviews include:

Francis Watson

 

James D. G. Dunn

 

Andrew T. Lincoln

 

Douglas A. Campbell

John J. Collins on Early Jewish Identity

John J. Collins has delivered annual Birks Lectures at McGill University (October 2014).

The first lecture (21 October, 2014) is on ‘Torah and Jewish Identity in Second Temple Judaism’:

 

The second lecture (22 October, 2014) is on ‘Non-Mosaic Forms of Judaism in the Second Temple Period’:

 

Biblical Studies Online Podcast 4: An Interview with Robert Myles and Michael Sandford

BSO

The latest Biblical Studies Online podcast is available on iTunes or, if iTunes isn’t your thing, available here.

RM&MS

James Crossley interviews Robert Myles, author of The Homeless Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew (Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2014), and Michael Sandford, author of Poverty, Wealth, and Empire: Jesus and Postcolonial Criticism (Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2014). In addition to discussing their latest books, the interview covers issues of class, postcolonialism, and biblical scholarship.

Biblical Studies Online Podcast 3: Jesus, Paul and Empire

The third installment of the Biblical Studies Online podcasts is now available on iTunes. The theme is ‘Jesus, Paul and Empire’:

James Crossley talks about a major recent trend in New Testament scholarship which casts Jesus, the Gospels and Paul as anti-imperial thinkers and suggests that while there may be some truth in this description, the imperialism in the New Testament should not be underestimated.

BSOThe iTunes Content Rating has been designated ‘clean’ so the podcast can be enjoyed by all the family.