Using this site

One of the best ways to make use of this site is to select a biblical studies category that interests you from the Categories list in the right-hand column. This will provide a complete list of resources available under that category.

The search facility in the top right-hand corner may also provide some assistance. Or alternatively, to check out the latest additions to the site, just scroll through the posts below.

Jew and Judean – A Marginalia Review of Books Forum

Jew-or-Judean

In a Marginalia forum on August 26, 2014, eight scholars write replies to Adele Reinhartz’s essay, “The Vanishing Jews of Antiquity”, Marginalia, June 24, 2014. Responses are by Steve Mason, Daniel Schwartz, Annette Yoshiko Reed, Joan Taylor, Malcolm Lowe, Jonathan Klawans, Ruth Sheridan, James Crossley. In addition, Adele Reinhartz provides a reply.

The essay and responses are available for download in epub and mobi formats.

Richard Bauckham with Chris Marshall: Jesus in Context Conference

Professor Richard Bauckham and Dr Chris Marshall presented a lecture series on the historical Jesus, at Carey College, 7-8 August 2014.

 

Richard Bauckham, “The World of the Lake of Galilee”

Richard Bauckham, “The Fishing Industry”

Richard Bauckham, “The Historical Jesus”

Interview with Richard Bauckham

Chris Marshall, “A Parable of Restorative Justice”

Interview with Chris Marshall

The Song of Songs: Francis X. Clooney, Cheryl Exum, Michael Fishbane, Paul Griffiths, and Stephanie Paulsell

Harvard Divinity School provides a video of “a conversation between five scholars on the Song of Songs”, held on April 15, 2013. The panel was chaired by CSWR director Francis X. Clooney, S.J., and featured Cheryl Exum of the University of Sheffield, Michael Fishbane of University of Chicago Divinity School, Paul Griffiths of Duke University, and Stephanie Paulsell of HDS.

Nathan McDonald on why the Old Testament is not Monotheistic

On April 6, 2009, Dr Nathan MacDonald, lecturer in Old Testament at the School of Divinity, University of St. Andrews, Scotland, delivered this lecture at Harvard Divinity School, examining “Israel’s religious history and assumptions of its monotheism”.

 

Biblical Studies Online Podcast 4: An Interview with Robert Myles and Michael Sandford

BSO

The latest Biblical Studies Online podcast is available on iTunes or, if iTunes isn’t your thing, available here.

RM&MS

James Crossley interviews Robert Myles, author of The Homeless Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew (Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2014), and Michael Sandford, author of Poverty, Wealth, and Empire: Jesus and Postcolonial Criticism (Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2014). In addition to discussing their latest books, the interview covers issues of class, postcolonialism, and biblical scholarship.

Biblical Studies Online Podcast 3: Jesus, Paul and Empire

The third installment of the Biblical Studies Online podcasts is now available on iTunes. The theme is ‘Jesus, Paul and Empire':

James Crossley talks about a major recent trend in New Testament scholarship which casts Jesus, the Gospels and Paul as anti-imperial thinkers and suggests that while there may be some truth in this description, the imperialism in the New Testament should not be underestimated.

BSOThe iTunes Content Rating has been designated ‘clean’ so the podcast can be enjoyed by all the family.

Candida Moss on The Invention of Voluntary Martyrdom in Early Christianity

persecuted-scholar

An iTune audio recording is available for Prof Candida Moss’s lecture, “The Invention of Voluntary Martyrdom in Early Christianity”, part of the Dean’s Lecture Series at Candler School of Theology, Nov 9, 2011.

Candida Moss is Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame.

h/t: Jim West

Rudolf Bultmann Lecture Audio: “The Concept of Freedom in Christianity and Classical Antiquity”

bultmann

For those of you who missed the live lecture, here’s Rudolf Bultmann speaking on “The Concept of Freedom in Christianity and Classical Antiquity” (mp3, 39mb, 43:00). From Princeton Theological Seminary, 1951.

Evil in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity

Videos are available of some of the speakers at the Evil in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity conference, St Mary’s College, Twickenham, May 23-24, 2014.

Prof Loren Stuckenbruck, “How Much Does the Christ Event Solve? Evil in New Testament Theology and Its Relation to Jewish Theology”

Prof Christopher Rollston, “The Rise of the Satan in Early Second Temple Judaism”

Dr Jutta Leonhardt-Balzer, “Evil at Qumran”

Dr Chris Tilling, “Paul, Evil, and Justification Debates”

Dr Tommy Wasserman, “Variants of Evil in the New Testament”

Dr Christopher Skinner, “Overcoming Satan, Overcoming the World: Exploring the Cosmologies of Mark and John”

Bible Odyssey – Online Bible Encyclopedia from SBL

bible-odyssey

Bible Odyssey is the Society of Biblical Literature’s online biblical studies resource, featuring articles on key subjects and passages in the Bible.

The Bible is a revered text for many and holds an iconic status in American and even global culture. And yet, studies show that people are unfamiliar with its key themes or stories—and who can blame them? The Bible is not one book, but many: a compilation of poetry, law codes, novellas, proverbs, gospels, and letters that were pulled together over the centuries. Being literate about the Bible is a tall order—but an important one. Given the Bible’s immense impact, our civic conversations and cultural awareness can only improve when we are able to recognize key people, places, and passages of the Bible.

In addition, readers are also unfamiliar with critical approaches to the text. There is a big difference between Bible study, which happens in a religious setting, and study of the Bible, which happens in an academic one.  Bible Odyssey addresses not only the literacy gap but also the gap between the academy and the “street.” Why should Bible scholars have all the fun? Wouldn’t you like to know about the Synoptic Question, or about J, E, P, and D?

Articles are written by biblical scholars and members of the Society of Biblical Literature. The site is an ongoing project, and has introductory articles on, for example:

David and Goliath (1 Sam 17), by Keith Bodner
The Nativity of Jesus, by Helen Bond
Mary Magdalene in Popular Culture, by Dan Clanton

 

M. Daniel Carroll on Ruth, Immigration, Amos, and Ethics

Professor M. Daniel Carroll, of Denver Seminary, delivers the Old Testament lectures for the 2013 Nils W. Lund Memorial Lecture series, on September 26, 2013, at North Park Theological Seminary:

Lecture 1: “Once a Stranger, Always a Stranger: Immigration, Assimilation, and the Book of Ruth”

Lecture 2: “Probing the Prophets for Social Ethics: Insights from Multiple Perspectives — The Case of Amos”

Paul Trebilco – Early Christian Self-Designations

Professor Paul Trebilco, of the University of Otago, presents his 2013 Nils W. Lund Memorial Lecture on early Christian self-designations, on September 25, 2013, at North Park Theological Seminary.

Amy-Jill Levine on Anti-Jewish New Testament Interpretation

Professor Amy-Jill Levine delivered the Comparative Theology Lecture at Harvard Divinity School on October 17, 2012: “From Donation to Diatribe: How Anti-Jewish Interpretation Cashes Out”.

In Mark 12:41-44, Jesus says of a poor widow who makes a donation to the Jerusalem Temple: “she has thrown in her whole life.” Is the widow exploited by a Jewish system that values money over compassion? Is she a faithful worshiper who reveals the Temple’s welcome of rich and poor, male and female? Is she a foreshadowing of Jesus, who will give up his life as a “ransom for many?” The answers depend upon the reader’s sensibilities.

Levine is University Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies, and Professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University Divinity School and College of Arts and Sciences.

Levine’s lecture commences at 5:57.

Free Online Course: The Bible’s Prehistory, Purpose, and Political Future, with Jacob L. Wright

emory

Professor Jacob Wright of Emory University is to present a 7-week Coursera MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) on the development of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament: “The Bible’s Prehistory, Purpose, and Political Future”.

The course will commence Monday, May 26, 2014, and enrolments are now open.

About the Course

The objectives of the course are to show:
—how the Bible emerged from large-scale corporate crisis and rupture;
—that in our present state of uncertainty and instability we have much to learn from the various strategies the biblical authors adopted to create an enduring “people of the book”;
—that one doesn’t have to believe in God or accept the historicity of the Bible in order to appreciate its profound political messages;
—that the Bible offers modern societies a model for creating communities around a shared collection of texts, songs, and laws;
—and that the Bible itself has a major role to play in our futures.

Course Syllabus

Week 1: The Riddle That Has Yet To Be Solved
The Bible’s Purpose
Books in Ancient Religions
Between “Church and State”
Theologies of the Bible
A Shared Text
The Bible as a “Pedagogical Program of Peoplehood”

Week 2: The Rise and Fall
Israel’s Place in the World of the Ancient Near East
The Emergence of Two Competing Kingdoms
Military Triumphs
The Onslaught of Imperial Powers
Defeat and Deportation
Conditions of Conquest

Week 3: The Making of the Bible as a Response to Defeat
Diaspora and Divided Communities
Creating a Shared Past and Common Ancestors
The Pentateuch and Historical Narratives
One People with Multiple Law Codes
Creating a Collection of National Songs and Laments
Reinterpreting Prophecies
Comparative Cases: English and German History

Week 4: Reinventing the Hero
Martial Valor, Masculinity, and Martyrdom
Long Life versus Glorified Heroic Death
The New Role of the Family
From Battles to Building
Comparatives Cases: From the Crow Nation to Jane Austen

Week 5: A Wise and Discerning People  
The Role of Education
National Education Programs: From 19th Century Germany to the Dalai Lama
From Deuteronomy to Ezra-Nehemiah
Freedom of Information and Open Access
Making Priestly Knowledge Public
The Attempts of the State to Control Prophets
Divine Knowledge for the People, Not Solely the King
The Reason Why Biblical Writings Survived Catastrophes

Week 6: Covenant and Kinship
The Rise of Empires
One God
A New “Political-Theology”
Covenantal Ethics of Peoplehood
The Power of Law
Protecting the Individual and Defending Difference
Caring for the Land

Week 7: The Bible’s Future
The Bible’s Pedagogical and Political Purpose
The Bible’s Radical Theology
The Bible as an Attempt to Unify Rival Communities
The Bible’s Impact on Political Identities Throughout the World
The Bible’s Role in the Public Sphere and in Secular Society
The Bible as a Model for New Forms of Community

Joel Green: On Doing Without a Soul

Dr. Joel Green delivers a paper at the Neuroscience and the Soul Conference, “On Doing Without a Soul: A New Testament Perspective”, Biola University, May 10, 2013.

Dr. Joel Green discusses the theological anthropology of the New Testament. He argues that the writings of the New Testament do not necessitate a dualist view of human substance. Rather, he argues for a monism that encompasses the physical and non-physical aspects of humanity. Dr. Doug Huffman responds to his argument.

See also, from the same conference:

John Cooper, “Biblical Hermeneutics and the Body-Soul Debate”

Panel Two: Joel Green, Doug Huffman, John W. Cooper, and Jason McMartin